The International Journal of Communication invites you to read these papers that published in MAY

Announcements header

The International Journal of Communication has published 48 papers in MAY 2017 which includes three Special Sections on Mediadem, Venture Labor and the Korean Wave. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below or go to ijoc.org to read the Special Sections.

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ARTICLES

Editorial Surveillance and the Management of Visibility in Peer Production
Christian Pentzold

Information Technology and Sustainability in the Information Society
Christian Fuch

Thank You, Mr. President: Journalist Gender in Presidential News Conferences
Lindsey Meeks

Illusions of Knowledge: Media Exposure and Citizens’ Perceived Political Competence
Mathias Weber, Christina Koehler

Election Pledge Rhetoric: Selling Policy with Words
Elina Lindgren, Elin Naurin

The Reasons Behind Tracing Audience Behavior: A Matter of Paternalism and Transparenc
Ester Appelgren

National Security Culture: Gender, Race and Class in the Production of Imperial Citizenship
Deepa Kumar

Influences on Job Expectations Among Chilean Journalism Students
Claudia Mellado, Andrés Scherman

The Effects of Generational Identification Accessibility and Normative Fit on Hostile Media Perception
Jisu Kim, Sung-Yeon Park

Internet Use, Freedom Supply, and Demand for Internet Freedom: A Cross-National Study of 20 Countries
Fei Shen

#Fringe, Audiences and Fan Labor: Twitter Activism to Save a TV Show From Cancellation
Mar Guerrero-Pico

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Mark Lloyd and Lewis A. Friedland (Eds.), The Communication Crisis in America and How to Fix It
Jay G. Blumler

Gil Z. Hochberg, Visual Occupations: Violence and Visibility in a Conflict Zone
Jeff Heydon

Andrew T. Lamas, Todd Wolfson, and Peter N. Funke (Eds.), The Great Refusal
Hao Cao

Jason Mittell, Complex TV: The Poetics of Contemporary Television Storytelling
Art Herbig

Making Sense of Communication Power and the New Information Warfare
Nathalie Maréchal

Brian Massumi, Ontopower: War, Powers, and the State of Perception
Catherine Chaput

Tim Highfield, Social Media and Everyday Politics
Erhaaaardt Graeff

Jeffrey Pomerantz, Metadata
Indrek Ibrus

Frank J. Macke, The Experience of Human Communication: Body, Flesh, and Relationship
Diana Ritter

Ulises Ali Mejias, Off the Network: Disrupting the Digital World
Pallaavi Guha

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Thank you for your continuing interest in the work that IJoC publishes.

 

Larry Gross                                                   
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

International Journal of Communication 
Publishes a Special Section on the Korean Wave

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The Special Section The Korean Wave: Retrospect and Prospect, guest-edited by Dal Yong Jin and Tae-jin Yoon, published on May 23, 2017 includes eight articles by Asian media scholars.

The Korean Wave refers to the increasing popularity of Korean pop music, TV dramas, and movies throughout the world. Also known as hallyu in Korean, the term was first coined by the Chinese press in the late 1990s to describe the growing popularity of Korean pop culture in China.

The rapid growth of Korea’s cultural industries and the penetration of Korean cultural products in the global markets celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2017. The Korean Wave primarily started with a few well-made television dramas that were popular in East Asia; and Korean cultural industries subsequently developed other cultural forms, such as K-pop and digital games, that have gradually penetrated global markets.

The collection of articles in this Special Section explore the history of the Korean Wave as a catalyst of regional and global change by analyzing the evolution, structure, mechanisms, and strategies employed by the music, television, film, digital games, and animation industries in the global markets and their shifting relationships with the nation-state. They not only provide empirically plausible frameworks to examine their operations, but also discuss several key dimensions of the Korean Wave to help readers understand the nature of the emerging local popular culture and digital technologies as a new trend.

We invite you to read these articles that published in the International Journal of Communication.  Please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking to the papers of interest.

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The Korean Wave: Retrospect and Prospect ― Introduction
Dal Yong Jin, Tae-jin Yoon

K-Pop in Latin America: Transcultural Fandom and Digital Mediation
Ben Han

K-Pop Fans React: Hybridity and the White Celebrity-Fan on YouTube
David Oh

When Indonesians Routinely Consume Korean Pop Culture: Revisiting Jakartan Fans of Korean Drama Dae Jang Geum
Jae-Seon Jeong, Seul-Hi Lee, Sang-Gil Lee

Domestic Hallyu: K-Pop Metatexts and the Media’s Self-Reflexive Gesture
Michelle Cho

Korean Wave Studies as Method: Reconsidering the Television Format Phenomenon between South Korea and China through Inter-Asian Frameworks
Younghan Cho, Hongrui Zhu

Cultural Translation of K-Pop Among Asian Canadian Fans
Kyong Yoon

Between Hybridity and Hegemony in K-Pop’s Global Popularity: A Case of “Girls’ Generation’s” American Debut
Gooyong Kim

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Larry Gross
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Dal Yong Jin, Tae-jin Yoon
Guest Editors

International Journal of Communication 
Publishes a Special Section on Venture Labor

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Do workers now see taking big risks as the only way to get ahead?

What is the impact of the high-stakes technology startup culture on the rest of the U.S. economy?

What lessons do the trends in media and communication jobs teach us about the future of work?

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Edited by Laura Robinson, Gina Neff, and Jeremy Schulz, this Special Section on Venture Labor begins to answer these and other timely questions about work and workers today.

A broad-ranging group of international scholars explores the concept of venture labor from multiple perspectives. Venture labor is the explicit expression of entrepreneurial values by non-entrepreneurs. As contributors argue, venture labor leads to the normalization of risk-taking in work, even when the odds are long and the winners are few. Nonetheless, a spirit of risk-taking, once seen as restricted to technology start-ups, now attracts workers across many industries willing to forgo the benefits and safety nets of traditional employment in exchange for new risks and opportunities.

Venture labor contributes to the shift of risk away from the social collectivity to the individual. This collection of essays covers venture labor phenomena including self-branding, social media professional marketing, entrepreneurial journalism, anytime-anywhere work, entrepreneurial self-actualization, crowdsourcing, and labor on ‘spec’ and other unpaid labor are all part of the venture labor trend covered in.

The Special Section brings together voices from multiple social science perspectives including communication, sociology, and media studies, with contributions from Laura Robinson, Jeremy Schulz, Alice E. Marwick, Nicole S. Cohen, C.W. Anderson, Michelle Rodino-Colocino, Enda Brophy, Gina Neff, Paul Hirsch, Sarah Banet-Weiser, Ofer Sharone, Barry Wellman, Dimitrina Dimitrova, Tsahi Hayat, Guang Ying Mo, Beverly Wellman, and Antonio Casilli. Together, these contributors grapple with the power of contradictory forces remaking the workplaces of the 21st century.

We invite you to read these 14 essays that published in the International Journal of Communication on May 10, 2017 at ijoc.org.

Larry Gross
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Laura Robinson, Gina Neff, Jeremy Schulz
Guest Editors

International Journal of Communication 
Publishes a Special Section on Mediadem

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The EU-funded Mediadem project, which ran for three years from April 2010, explored the factors that promote or hinder the realization of media freedom and independence in 14 European countries.  The countries included in the study  included long-standing EU Member State, such as Germany, Finland and the UK; more recent members, such as Slovakia, Estonia and Croatia; and applicant states such as Turkey.

Edited by Rachael Craufurd Smith, this Special Section on Supporting Free and Independent Media in Europe: Findings from the Mediadem Project,  by academics and experts working in the field, draws on the Mediadem research and focuses on three key themes that were central to the project:  1) The future of public service media provision in Europe and the extent to which international standards can, and  have been, used to direct its development;  2) How journalistic ethics can be nurtured and maintained in today’s highly competitive, and often financially stretched, media markets and 3) the constitutional limits of state regulation and the role of self-regulation in a media environment dominated by powerful private corporations.

The articles thus explore the influence of international and European standards on economically, politically and culturally diverse countries and whether there remains a role for professionalization in supporting independent reporting, given the rise of “citizen journalism” and the increasingly casual and precarious nature of journalists’ employment.

We invite you to read these articles that published in the International Journal of Communication on May 8, 2017.  Please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking to the papers of interest.

Findings From the Mediadem Project: Supporting Free and Independent Media in Europe Introduction
Rachael Craufurd Smith

The Freedom and Independence of Public Service Media in Europe: International Standards and Their Domestic Implementation
Evangelia Psychogiopoulou, Dia Anagnostou, Rachael Craufurd Smith, Yolande Stolte

Journalistic Autonomy as a Professional Value and Element of Journalism Culture: The European Perspective
Epp Lauk, Halliki Harro-Loit

Of Journalists and Money: The Employment of Journalists in Romania and Its Influence on Media Freedom and Quality
Ioana Avădani

Private Regulation and Freedom of Expression
Fabrizio Cafaggi, Frederica Casarosa, Tony Prosser

Larry Gross
Editor     

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Rachael Craufurd Smith
Guest Editor

The International Journal of Communication invites you to read these papers that published in APRIL 2017

Announcements header

The International Journal of Communication has published 23 papers in April 2017. We invite you to read these papers which can be accessed at ijoc.org, or Ctrl+Click on the article title below. We look forward to your feedback!

ARTICLES

The Hostile Suffering Effect: Mediated Encounters With the Suffering of Opponents, Recognition, and Moral Concern in Protracted Asymmetrical Conflict
Rotem Nagar, Ifat Maoz

Mainstream Versus Ethnic Media: How They Shape Ethnic Pride and Self-Esteem Among Ethnic Minority Audiences
Srividya Ramasubramanian, Marissa Joanna Doshi, Muniba Saleem

Informed Switchers? How the Impact of Election News Exposure on Vote Change Depends on Political Information Efficacy
Sabine Geers, Linda Bos, Claes H. De Vreese

Putting Out Fire with Gasoline in Tahrir Square: Revisiting the Gamson Hypothesis
Bahaa Gameel, Shuning Lu, Hyeri Jung, Thomas J. Johnson

Valuing Victims: A Comparative Framing Analysis of The Washington Post’s Coverage of Violent Attacks Against Muslims and Non-Muslims
Mohammed el-Nawawy, Mohamad Hamas Elmasry

 Information, Interest, and Ideology: Explaining the Divergent Effects of Government-Media Relationships in Argentina
Eugenia Mitchelstein, Pablo J. Boczkowski

Reading the 13th Five-Year Plan: Reflections on China’s ICT Policy
Yu Hong

Creative Appropriations in Hybrid Spaces: Mobile Interfaces in Art and Games in Brazil
Adriana de Souza e Silva, Fernanda Duarte, Cristiane S. Damasceno

Attributional Chromatics: How Does the Color of Written Communication Affect Interpersonal Perceptions?
Adam S. Richards, Edward L. Fink

Public Spheres of Skepticism: Climate Skeptics’ Online Comments in the German Networked Public Sphere
Jonas Kaiser

Testing the Power of Game Lessons: The Effects of Art Style and Narrative Complexity on Reducing Cognitive Bias
Rosa Mikeal Martey, Adrienne Shaw, Jennifer Stromer-Galley, Kate Kenski, Benjamin Clegg, James Folkestad, Tobi Saulnier, Tomek Strzalkowski

Complex Structures: Meaning Formation amid China’s New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme
Mohan J. Dutta, Kang Sun

Exploring Message Targeting at Home and Abroad: The Role of Political and Media Considerations in the Rhetorical Dynamics of Conflict Resolution
Elie Friedman, Zohar Kampf, Meital Balmas

Colombian Journalists on Twitter: Opinions, Gatekeeping, and Transparency in Political Coverage
Victor Garcia-Perdomo

The Value of Representation: Toward a Critique of Networked Television Performance  Aymar Jean Christian


FEATURES

Journalism Professors in the German Democratic Republic: A Collective Biography
Michael Meyen, Thomas Wiedemann

A Word to Set the Stage for a Memento from the Recent Past
Howard S. Becker


BOOK REVIEWS

Jiyeon Kang, Igniting the Internet: Youth and Activism in Postauthoritarian South Korea
Steffi Shook

Stephen T. Russell and Stacey S. Horn (Eds.), Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Schooling
Traci Gillig

Christopher Chávez, Reinventing the Latino Television Viewer: Language, Ideology, and Practice
Lindani Mbunyuza-Memani

Patrick Burkart, Pirate Politics: The New Information Policy Contests
Kenneth Merrill

Hongmei Li, Advertising and Consumer Culture in China
Min Wang

Shilpa Davé, LeiLani Nishime, and Tasha Oren (Eds.), Global Asian American Popular Cultures
Cynthia Wang

 

Thank you for your continuing interest in the work that IJoC publishes.

Larry Gross                                                   
Editor  

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

The International Journal of Communication invites you to read these papers that published in MARCH 2017

Announcements header

The International Journal of Communication has published 41 papers in March 2017 including a Special Section on Digital Storytelling as well as a Special Section on Mediating Asia. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below or go to ijoc.org.

ARTICLES

The Relativity of Sociodemographic Determinism on the Digital Divide in High School Students in Ecuador
Ramón Tirado-Morueta, Damian Mendoza-Zambrano, Isidro Marín-Gutiérrez, Mariuxi Mendoza-Zambrano

The Ontology of the Intellectual Commons
Antonios Broumas

 Pivot to Internet Plus: Molding China’s Digital Economy for Economic Restructuring?
Yu Hong

Analyzing the Existence and Relation of Optimistic Bias and First-Person Perception for an Impersonal Environmental Change
Rebecca M. Rogers, Cornelia Wallner, Bernhard Goodwin, Werner Heitland, Wolfgang W. Weisser, Hans-Bernd Brosius

New Urban Players: Stratagematic Use of Media by Banksy and the Hong Kong Umbrella Movement
Paola Monachesi, Marina Turco

Good News in Bad News: How Negativity Enhances Economic Efficacy
Helle Mølgaard Svensson, Erik Albæk, Arjen van Dalen, Claes de Vreese

The Afterlife of Critique: The Communicability of Criticism and the Publicity of Polemic Concerning Public Debate in the Turkish Press
Özgür Gürsoy, Gokcen Karanfil

Celebrity Influence and Young People’s Attitudes Toward Cosmetic Surgery in Singapore: The Role of Parasocial Relationships and Identification
Nainan Wen

The Curious Absence of Economic Analysis at the Federal Communications Commission: An Agency in Search of a Mission
Gerald R. Faulhaber, Hal J. Singer, Augustus H. Urschel

The State of the Field of Social Norms Research
Hillary C. Shulman, Nancy Rhodes, Emily Davidson, Rachel Ralston,
Lorraine Borghetti, Lindsey Morr

Extreme Speech Online: An Anthropological Critique of Hate Speech Debates
Matti Pohjonen, Sahana Udupa

Look Who’s Talking To Our Kids: Representations of Race and Gender In TV Commercials On Nickelodeon
Adam Peruta, Jack Powers

Values and Configuration of Users in the Design of Software Source Code
Stéphane Couture

FEATURES

A Coming Singularity in Media Regulation: The American Case
Russell Neuman

“Coder,” “Activist,” “Hacker”: Aaron Swartz in the Italian, UK, U.S. and Technology Press
Philip Di Salvo


BOOK REVIEWS

Eszter Hargittai and Christian Sandvig (Eds.), Digital Research Confidential: The Secrets of Studying Behavior Online
Lisa Farman

Deborah A. Macey, Kathleen M. Ryan, and Noah J. Springer (Eds.), How Television Shapes Our Worldview: Media Representations of Social Trends and Change
D.M. Greenwell

Gregory Ferrell Lowe and Fiona Martin (Eds.), The Value of Public Service Media
Luwei Rose Luqiu

Tilman Baumgärtel (Ed.), A Reader in International Media Piracy
Dom Caristi

Joseph D. Straubhaar, Jeremiah Spence, Vanessa Higgins Joyce, Vinicio Sinta, Adolfo Mora, Víctor García, and Luiz G. Duarte, The Evolution of Television: An Analysis of 10 years of TGI  Latin America (2004-2014) (Volume 1)
Sebastião Guilherme Albano

Kate Nash, Craig Hight, and Catherine Summerhayes (Eds.), New Documentary Ecologies: Emerging Platforms, Practices and Discourses
Heather McIntosh

Shi-xu, Kwesi Kwaa Prah, and María Laura Pardo, Discourses of the Developing World: Researching Properties, Problems and Potentials
Geqi Wu

Rahab Nyaga, Dorothy Njoroge and Charles Nyambuga, An Introduction to Communication
Irene Awino, H. Leslie Steeves

Olga Baysha, The Mythologies of Capitalism and the End of the Soviet Project
Oliver Boyd-Barrett

Sara Ahmed, Willful Subjects
Ayanna Serenity Dozier
Thank you for your continuing interest in the work that IJoC publishes.

Larry Gross
Editor                                                    

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on Mediating Asia: Information, Democracy, and the State In and Before the Digital Age

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on Mediating Asia: Information, Democracy,
and the State In and Before the Digital Age

mediating asia

What are the political, economic and cultural implications of an increasingly robust and globally penetrating Asia-based media industry?  How have Asian states tried to manage the diffuse representations of Asia emerging from informal yet globalized media channels?

Guest-edited by Tim Oakes, this Special Section on Mediating Asia by Asian media scholars and professional journalists explores the changing relationships between Asian states and Asia-based media institutions and industries as the nature and role of media in Asian society undergoes profound change.  With the increasing visibility and power of Indian film, Korean television, and Japanese animation industries, and of Asian broadcasting networks such as Star TV and Aljazeera, there has been no shortage of scholarly attention devoted to the rise of Asian media.  This collection, however, focuses less on the meteoric rise and power of Asian media itself and more on how that rise has been negotiated by Asian states, with a particular focus on China and Indonesia.  As digital media technologies become ubiquitous, both formal and informal media platforms push beyond state boundaries, challenging state efforts to control the content of and access to information and entertainment.  This challenge is addressed in commentaries by three journalists with extensive Asian experience, and three academics exploring the spatial and historical contexts of an increasingly mediated Asia.

We invite you to read these articles that published in the International Journal of Communication on March 23, 2017.  Please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking to the papers of interest.

Mediating Asia: Information, Democracy, and the State in and before the Digital Age ―  Introduction
Tim Oakes, University of Colorado Boulder

Mediating Indonesia: The Slow Emergence of a Young Nation ― Commentary
Endy M. Bayuni, The Jakarta Post

Reporting From China: 400 Reports, on 1.4 Billion People, in One Authoritarian State ― Commentary
Melissa K. Chan, Al Jazeera

Guidance and Transgression: The Contest for Narratives of Environment and Pollution in China ― Commentary
Isabel Hilton, Chinadialogue

Pressing the Issue: Sino-American Discourse on the Proper Role of the Media, Past and Present
Timothy B. Weston, University of Colorado Boulder

Enlightenment and the Revolutionary Press in Colonial Indonesia
Rianne Subijanto, Baruch College, City University of New York

Between State and Capital: Asia’s Media Revolution in the Age of Neoliberal Globalization
Michael Curtin, University of California Santa Barbara

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Larry Gross
Editor                                                            

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Tim Oakes
Guest Editor