IJoC Publishes Special Section on (Un)civil Society in Digital China

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on (Un)civil Society in Digital China  

Is China becoming an uncivil society? How have state policies and online incivility contributed to new forms of intra-societal conflict? How can civility (or incivility) be reconceptualized to facilitate comparative analysis across countries, regime types, and cultures?

The International Journal of Communication is delighted to announce the publication of a new Special Section on “(Un)civil Society in Digital China: Incivility, Fragmentation, and Political Stability” on May 8, 2018 which includes five articles from international scholars.

China fingerAi Weiwei, “Study of Perspective, Tiananmen.” Source: Public Delivery

Co-edited by Min Jiang and Ashley Esarey, this Special Section on (Un)civil Society in Digital China explores how the Chinese Internet is utilized by an authoritarian state to concentrate and solidify its power in the name of civility, rationality and order and considers how expressions of incivility online delegitimize regime critics and create ultra-nationalist identities.

Moving beyond definitions of civility (or incivility) based on democratic norms of deliberation and reciprocity, this Special Section’s theoretical introduction argues that civility should be distinguished from politeness and founded in respect for others’ communicative rights, including the right to self-expression in pursuit of social justice. These conceptual modifications can help to facilitate contextualized and comparative studies of civility and incivility across regions and polities.

To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking  or go to ijoc.org.  We look forward to your feedback.

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Uncivil Society in Digital China: Incivility, Fragmentation, and Political Stability
Min Jiang, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Ashley Esarey, University of Alberta

Demobilizing the Emotions of Online Activism in China: A Civilizing Process
Guobin Yang, University of Pennsylvania

Withering Gongzhi: Cyber Criticism of Chinese Public Intellectuals
Rongbin Han, University of Georgia

Slogans and Slurs, Misogyny and Nationalism: A Case Study of Anti-Japanese Sentiment by Chinese Netizens in Contentious Social Media Comments
Jason Q. Ng, Citizen Lab, University of Toronto
Eileen Le Han, Michigan State University

Wenming Bu Wenming: The Socialization of Incivility in Postdigital China
Gabriele de Seta, Academia Sinica Institute of Ethnology, Taiwan

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Larry Gross
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Min Jiang, Ashley Esarey
Guest Editors

IJoC Publishes 20 Papers in APRIL 2018

Announcements header

International Journal of Communication invites you to read these 20 papers that published in APRIL

The International Journal Communication is pleased to announce the publication of 20 papers in April 2018 including the Special Section on Nuit Debout. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking  or go to ijoc.org.  We look forward to your feedback!
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ARTICLES

Power Pressures and Pocketbook Concerns: Perceptions of Organizational Influences on News Content in the Television Industry
Rita Colistra

The Agency Makes the (Online) News World go Round: The Impact of News Agency Content on Print and Online News
Jelle Boumans, Damian Trilling, Rens Vliegenthart, Hajo Boomgaarden

Live From New York, It’s Trump on Twitter! The Effect of Engaging With Saturday Night Live on Perceptions of Authenticity and the Salience of Trait Ratings
Amy B. Becker

Echo Chambers in Parliamentary Twitter Networks: The Catalan Case
Marc Esteve Del Valle, Rosa Borge Bravo

Who Speaks for the Past? Social Media, Social Memory, and the Production of Historical Knowledge in Contemporary China
Jun Liu

Studying Real-Time Audience Responses to Political Messages: A New Research Agenda
Stephen Coleman, Giles Moss, Alvaro Martinez-Perez

Entertainment, News, and Income Inequality: How Colombian Media Shape Perceptions of Income Inequality and Why It Matters
David Coppini, German Alvarez, Hernando Rojas

The Ecological Dynamics of Organizational Change: Density Dependence in the Rate of Weibo Adoption by Populations of News Organizations
Yu Xu

Examining the Connectedness of Connective Action: The Participant-Initiated Facebook Pages in Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement
Yin Zhang, Francis L. F. Lee

Political Participation in Hong Kong: The Roles of News Media and Online Alternative Media
Chuanli Xia, Fei Shen


BOOK REVIEWS

Kalu N. Kalu, Citizenship: Identity, Institutions, and the Postmodern Challenge
Sonia Pedro Sebastiao

Jian Xu, Media Events in Web 2.0 China: Interventions of Online Activism
Mingxiao Sui

Adrienne Russell, Journalism as Activism: Recoding Media Power
Yazan Badran

Domesticating the Global: Manga Beyond Japan
James Lee

Dániel Z. Kádár, Politeness, Impoliteness and Ritual: Maintaining the Moral Order in Iinterpersonal Interaction
Xiaoyu Lai

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Larry Gross
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

IJoC Publishes a Special Section on Nuit Debout

The International Journal of Communication is delighted to announce the publication of a new Special Section on “Nuit Debout” on April 30, 2018

The International Journal of Communication is delighted to announce the publication of a new Special Section on “Nuit Debout” on April 30, 2018

This Special Section “The French Nuit Debout Movement: Communication Struggles and Tactics” brings together four research articles, an interview with a celebrity journalist-activist filmmaker, and the guest editor’s essay conjuncturally contextualizing the movement as a critique of everyday (-night) life.

The Nuit Debout social movement that launched in 2016 is perhaps the most remarkable Left French movement since the May 1968 revolts and bears important similarities to and contrasts with recent movements such as Occupy and Les Indignados. Triggered by widespread indignation at a labor reform law, this “movement of the square” quickly became much more: a prefigurative participatory democracy as well as social politics—a performative critique of the status quo. It met nightly for two months in Paris’s Place de la République, spreading to hundreds of French cities and abroad.

Nuit Debout photo

The contributions in this Special Section explore the question of Nuit Debout’s distinctiveness but also its communication features that share a transnational repertoire of contention. They contribute revealing and challenging case studies. They provide conceptual and broad theoretical developments, implicitly and explicitly questioning the growing body of research on social movements (especially of the squares and especially with regard to uses and challenges of new communication tools, strategies and tactics). These papers help us understand new especially digital tools in repertoires of contention and repression.

More specifically, contributors traverse a broad terrain of communication practices and theory: hackers and makers of apps; out-of-the-cloud communication for internal organization and prefigurative group political communication, as well as outward broadcasting; a theory of a renewed activist journalism; the role or influence of celebrities; theoretical reflection on the emotional dimensions of storytelling in alternative journalism and in the cohesion-building of sustained collective action; the perceived and hidden (i.e., mediated) temporality and chronology of movements’ moves and rejuvenations, their composition, decomposition and re-composition; the historical and cultural reach of participants’ knowledges, tools and aspirations; police and counter-protesters’ strategies; and the movement’s specific critique of representative democracy and everyday (through a counter-production of everynight) life.

To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking  or go to ijoc.org.  We look forward to your feedback.

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The Nuit Debout Movement: Communication, Politics, and the Counter-Production of “Everynight Life” — Introduction
Jayson Harsin

Strange Speech: Structures of Listening in Nuit Debout, Occupy, and 15M
Jessica Feldman

Nuit Debout, Media Technologies, and Prototyping Change (Feature)
Adrienne Russell

Toward a Creative Activism with a Sense of Humor: An Interview with François Ruffin
Serge Chaumier

Activist Reflexivity and Mediated Violence: Putting the Policing of Nuit Debout in Context
Anna Feigenbaum, Patrick McCurdy

From Social Movement to Social Rest: Recuperation in Occupy Wall Street, Nuit Debout, and Other Contemporary Struggles
Jack Bratich

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Larry Gross
Editor    

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Jayson Harsin
Guest Editor

International Journal of Communication invites you to read these 30 papers that published in MARCH

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The International Journal Communication is pleased to announce the publication of 30 papers in March 2018 including the Special Section on Privacy at the Margins. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking  or go to ijoc.org.  Good reading!
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ARTICLES

The Ecological Dynamics of Organizational Change: Density Dependence in the Rate of Weibo Adoption by Populations of News Organizations
Xu Yu

Examining the Connectedness of Connective Action: The Participant-Initiated Facebook Pages in Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement
Yin Zhang, Francis L. F. Lee

Political Participation in Hong Kong: The Roles of News Media and Online Alternative Media
Chuanli Xia, Fei Shen

American Realities on Public Television: Analysis of Independent Television Service’s Independent Documentaries, 2007–2016
Caty Borum Chattoo, Patricia Aufderheide, Michele Alexander, Chandler Green

The Role of Social Media in Protest Participation: The Case of Candlelight Vigils in South Korea
Sangwon Lee

Public and Personal Responses to Environmental Pollution in China: Differential Susceptibility, Direct Experience and Media Use
Shaojing Sun, Andy Merolla, Mihye Seo

Invitation to Witness: The Role of Subjects in Documentary Representations of the End of Life
Emily West

The Paradox of Source Credibility in Canadian and U.S. Domestic Counterterrorism Communications
Patrick Belanger, Susan Szmania

The Transnationalism of Cultural Journalism in Sweden: Outlooks and Introspection in the Global Era
Anna Roosvall, Andreas Widholm

“Seize Your Moment, My Lovely Trolls”: News, Satire, and Public Opinion About Net Neutrality
Paul R. Brewer, Dannagal G. Young, Jennifer L. Lambe, Lindsay H. Hoffman, Justin Collier

All at Once or Bit by Bit? How the Serialization of News Affects Recipients’ Attitudes Toward Politicians Involved in Scandals
Christian von Sikorski, Johannes Knoll

Contemporary Gurus in Indian Classrooms: Changing Professorial Authority and Cultural Tensions in Managing Digital Connectivity
Uttaran Dutta, Pauline Hope Cheong, Robert Shuter

Public Service Austerity Broadcasts: Framing the Euro Debt Crisis
Mark Cullinane

BOOK REVIEWS

Bilge Yesil, Media In New Turkey: The Origins of an Authoritarian Neoliberal State
Melike Asli Sim

Tania Lewis, Fran Martin and Wanning Sun, Telemodernities: Television and Transforming Lives in Asia
Yang Bai

Jack Qiu, Goodbye iSlave: A Manifesto for Digital Abolition
Janice Hua Xu

Nico Carpentier, The Discursive-Material Knot: Cyprus in Conflict and Community Media Participation
John D.H. Downing

Stephen Coleman, Can the Internet Strengthen Democracy?
Niall P. Stephens

Kylie Jarrett, Feminism, Labor and Digital Media The Digital Housewife
Yuanjie Xia
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Larry Gross
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

ITID Publishes Special Section on Gender, Mobile, and Development

Information Technologies & International Development Publishes a Special Section on
Gender, Mobile, and Development
 

Information Technologies & International Development is delighted to announce the publication of a new Special Section on “Gender, Mobile, and Mobile Internet: Opportunities and Challenges in Mobile-Centric Use” which features five articles from international scholars and guest-edited by Savita Bailur, Silvia Masiero, and Jo Tacchi.

What exactly is “Gender, Mobile and Mobile Internet”? 

Women in low- and middle-income countries are, on average, 10% less likely to own a mobile phone than men, which translates into 184 million fewer women owning mobile phones, per the Groupe Spéciale Mobile Association’s (GSMA) latest Mobile Gender Gap Report (2018). The report also states that some 1.2 billion women in low- and middle-income countries do not have access to mobile Internet. These are thought-provoking figures in an increasingly digital age, but what happens when we go beyond access as a metric when it comes to women, mobiles and mobile Internet? SDG 5 (one of the 17 “sustainable development goals”) aims to “achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls” by 2030, and specifically, to enhance the use of enabling technology to promote the empowerment of women. This Special Section asks what “empowerment” through technology, especially mobiles, means for women and how it is achieved.

ITIDnairobi pix
An interviewee from Kibera, Nairobi in
Caribou’s Digital Lives in Kenya, Ghana and Uganda research. Photo: iHub/Caribou Digital

We discuss both the opportunities and challenges of mobile and mobile Internet for women. Ronda Zelezny-Green, looks at secondary school girls in Nairobi and how they access educational content after work; Becky Faith’s paper focuses on unemployed and low-income women in Brighton — an English seaside resort town — rather than a “developing country,” showing that development is a broader process; Susan Wyche and Jennifer Olson share the realities of women and mobiles in rural Kenya; and Bushra Hassan, Tim Unwin and Akber Gardezi explore online gender harassment in Pakistan.

Our argument throughout all papers is that “empowerment” is not a given for women once they have access to a mobile or mobile Internet. We borrow gender and development theorist Andrea Cornwall’s matrix of empowerment as a framework to show that access is merely the start of women’s journeys with mobile and mobile Internet. Once on mobile, after access, other challenges need to be negotiated (e.g., from finding a place to recharge a phone battery if you are homeless to facing gender harassment online).

This Special Section of Information Technologies and International Development is guest-edited by Savita Bailur, Caribou Digital and the Media and Communications Department at the London School of Economics, Silvia Masiero, Loughborough University, and Jo Tacchi, Loughborough University. The papers presented here employ both quantitative and qualitative methodology to critically question the concept of empowerment which is often unproblematically equated with women’s access to mobiles.

We invite you to read these ITID papers that published March 7, 2018. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking or go to itidjournal.org____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Gender, Mobile, and Development: The Theory and Practice of Empowerment — Introduction
Savita Bailur, Silvia Masiero, Jo Tacchi

Mother, May I? Conceptualizing the Role of Personal Characteristics and the Influence of Intermediaries on Girls’ After-School Mobile Appropriation in Nairobi
Ronda Zelezny-Green

Maintenance Affordances and Structural Inequalities: Mobile Phone Use by Low-Income Women in the United Kingdom
Becky Faith

Kenyan Women’s Rural Realities, Mobile Internet Access, and “Africa Rising”
Susan Wyche, Jennifer Olson

Understanding the Darker Side of ICTs: Gender, Sexual Harassment, and Mobile Devices in Pakistan
Bushra Hassan, Tim Unwin, Akber Gardezi

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Savita Bailur, Silvia Masiero, Jo Tacchi
Guest Editors

François Bar, Kentaro Toyama                                  
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor        

IJoC Publishes Special Section on Privacy at the Margins

International Journal of Communication Publishes
a Special Section on Privacy at the Margins

Privacy

The International Journal of Communication is delighted to announce the publication of a new Special Section on “Privacy at the Margins” on March 1, 2018 which includes 10 articles from international scholars.

Privacy is considered a human right, but achieving privacy in a networked age requires a certain level of privilege. This Special Section on Privacy at the Margins brings together nine original social science papers and an editorial introduction to reveal the complex dynamics—such as coercion and consent—that underpin a range of privacy experiences around the world.

Edited by Alice E. Marwick, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Data & Society and danah boyd, Microsoft Research and Data & Society, the papers presented in this Special Section of the International Journal of Communication use a diverse array of methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative, to address issues and domains including workplace surveillance, interpersonal privacy, and government privacy processes. In order to “interrogate what privacy looks like on the margins,” the section explores privacy experiences in India and in Appalachia, and among Aboriginal Australians and Azerbaijani youth. Several papers account for the skills needed to be successful at achieving privacy, and the trade-offs required by those who both gain and lose from being visible. Notably, these articles challenge basic assumptions underlying privacy research and invite scholars to consider new facets of the problem.

To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking  or go to ijoc.org.  We look forward to your feedback.

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Understanding Privacy at the Margins — Introduction
Alice E. Marwick, danah boyd

Refractive Surveillance: Monitoring Customers to Manage Workers
Karen Levy, Solon Barocas

Not the Normal Trans Story: Negotiating Trans Narratives While Crowdfunding at the Margins
Niki Fritz, Amy Gonzales

Being At Home With Privacy: Privacy and Mundane Intimacy Through Same-Sex Locative Media Practices
Larissa Hjorth, Sarah Pink, Heather Horst

The Poverty of Privacy: Understanding Privacy Trade-Offs From Identity Infrastructure Users in India
Janaki Srinivasan, Savita Bailur, Emrys Schoemaker, Sarita Seshagiri

Technology in Rural Appalachia: Cultural Strategies of Resistance and Navigation
Sherry Hamby, Elizabeth Taylor, Allison Smith, Kimberly Mitchell, Lisa Jones

Concerns, Skills, and Activities: Multilayered Privacy Issues in Disadvantaged Urban Communities
Xiaoqian Li, Wenhong Chen, Joseph D. Straubhaar

Privacy Versus Relatedness: Managing Device Use in Australia’s Remote Aboriginal Communities
Ellie Rennie, Indigo Holcombe-James, Tyson Yunkaporta

Socially Mediated Visibility: Friendship and Dissent in Authoritarian Azerbaijan
Katy E. Pearce, Jessica Vitak, Kristen Barta

Settler Governance and Privacy: Canada’s Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement and the Mediation of State-Based Violence
Lara Fullenwieder, Adam Molnar
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Larry Gross
Editor 

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Alice E. Marwick and danah boyd
Guest Editors

IJPC Publishes Study on How Journalists Are Portrayed in the Early Years of the Silent Film

Announcements header

The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture
Journal (IJPC)
Publishes Study on How Journalists
Are Portrayed in the Early years of the Silent Film

A groundbreaking study of journalists’ portrayals in the first years of the silent film is featured in the seventh edition of The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culture Journal (The IJPC Journal). Other articles add to our critical understanding of how movies based on comic book superheroes have depicted the news media, and offer a glimpse at a heretofore un-examined area of study—the image of the journalist in British novels over the past century.

IJPC silent film image
“The Image of the Journalist in Silent Film, 1890 to 1929: Part One 1890 to 1919,” by Joe Saltzman with Liz Mitchell, is a comprehensive examination of how motion pictures in their infancy regularly turned to the press as subject matter. It is the first comprehensive study of the beginning of cinema’s earliest depictions of the journalist, mostly newspaper reporters, editors and publishers.

Although most of these movies have been lost (as is the case with the vast majority of silent films), detailed plot summaries and production stills can be found in silent film periodicals of the era, and they reveal that most of the clichés and stereotypes of today’s portrayals of journalists date back to the earliest days of film. Saltzman and Mitchell’s study examines the extent to which these depictions of the press were positive or negative; it also details the character types that emerged: the hard-bitten male reporter, the adventure-seeking war correspondent, the tough-but-tender female reporter, the advice-to-the-lovelorn columnist, the green cub reporter, the bellowing big-city editor, the sinister media baron, the acerbic drama critic, and the plucky newsboy, among others. The article also looks at the influence of the newspaper on silent film plots as part of a broader consideration of the relationship between the news media and the entertainment industry during the silent film era. Included with the article are links to 11 appendices that contain original reviews and summaries of the films that were examined as part of the study.

Katherine A. Foss’s “No Longer Seeking `Truth, Justice and the American Way’: Journalists and the Press in Comic Books and Contemporary Film Adaptations” looks at recent Hollywood adaptations of such comic book franchises as Batman, Superman, Spider-Man, and Captain America. In earlier movies about these superheroes, journalist characters often played key roles and the films presented a comparatively upbeat portrayal of the press. However, Foss argues that the movies of the past decade or so have minimized the role of journalism or have made the media an instrument for villainy. She considers the unsettling implications of such depictions for popular perceptions of journalism at a time when public trust in the news media is at a low ebb.

Sarah Lonsdale’s essay “The Journalist in British Fiction” presents a brief overview of her new book on the subject. She has studied more than 150 novels, short stories, poems, and plays that have focused on journalism in some way and that were written by British authors aiming at a broad “middlebrow” audience. Lonsdale suggests that fiction can provide unique insight into the mindset of the British journalist at specific historical moments over the past 100 years as well as into shifting literary attitudes toward the news media.

Please read these articles at
http://ijpc.uscannenberg.org/journal/index.php/ijpcjournal/issue/current

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The IJPC Journal is accepting manuscripts on any aspect of the image of the journalist or the public relations practitioner in popular culture.  Please contact the IJPC editors Joe Saltzman (saltzman@usc,edu), Matthew C. Ehrlich (mehrlich@illinois.edu), and Sammye Johnson  (sjohnson@trinity.edu).