International Journal of Communication announces the publication of 36 papers that published in NOVEMBER

International Journal of Communication invites you to read these 36 papers that published in November

The International Journal of Communication is pleased to announce the publication of 36 papers in NOVEMBER 2022, which includes the “Special Section on Precarious Migrants in a Sharing Economy.” To access these papers, Ctrl+Click on the titles below for direct hyperlinking or go to ijoc.org to read the Special Section.
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ARTICLES

The Dialectic Polarization of Consensus Formation: An Analysis of Civic Studies Media Discourse in Israel
Elie Friedman, Michal Neubauer-Shani

A Failed Regulatory Remedy? An Empirical Examination of Affordable BroadbandPlan Obligations
Hernan Galperin

The COVID−19 Vaccination Campaign and Disinformation on Twitter: The Role of Opinion Leaders and Political Social Media Influencers in the Italian Debate on Green Pass
Sara Monaci, Simone Persico

Gamer Identity and Social Class: An Analysis of Barcelona Teenagers’ Discourses on Videogame Culture and Gaming Practices
Júlia Vilasís-Pamos, Óliver Pérez-Latorre

Taking the Audience Seriously? The Normative Construction of Engaged Journalism
Jacob L. Nelson, Thomas R. Schmidt

Who You Are Can Predict What You Say on a Virtual Date: Traits as Predictors of Communication Patterns of Young Men Who Have Sex With Men
Liyuan Wang, Ashley Brown, Lynn C. Miller

A Serial Mediation Model Predicting Covid-19 Vaccines Acceptance in Portugal: The Critical Role of Conspiracy Theories in the Wake of Perceived Quality of Government Communication and National Stereotypes
Christin-Melanie Vauclair, Elena Piccinelli

LGBTQ+ Collegiate Athletes and the Double Bind: Insights From the Experiences of Out Varsity Athletes
Evan Brody, D. Travers Scott, Katrina L. Pariera

Live, Work, Play: Exploring the Rhetorical Dimension of Remote Work Attraction Incentives Programs
Alberto Lusoli

Cognitive Dissonance in Social Media and Face-to-Face Interactions in Relation to the Legacy of War
Sanja Vico

The Other Side of the Pandemic: Effects of Racialized News Coverage on Attitudes Toward Asians and Immigrants
Martina Santia, Ayla Oden, Seon-Woo Kim, Raymond J. Pingree, Jessica Wyers, Kirill Bryanov

Balancing Opportunities and Incentives: How Rising China’s Mediated Public Diplomacy Changes Under Crisis
Kentaro Nakamura

Coping With Disruption: What This New World Says About Digital Divide Theory
Ashley J. Coventry, Crystal Leung, Bryan Zuniga, Kacey Hsu, Amy L. Gonzales

Agents of Change and Contentious Agents Interwoven Narratives in the Visual Representations of the Protester in News Magazine Covers
Delia Dumitrica, Alexandra Schwinges

Cultivating Communication Resilience as an Adaptive-Transformative Process During a Global Pandemic: Extending the Purview of the Communication Theory of Resilience
Adwoa Sikayena Amankwah, Prince Adu Gyamfi, Abigail Narkie Oduro

Visual Representations in Organizational Instagram Photos and the Public’s Responses: Focusing on Nonprofit Organizations
Yunhwan Kim, Siyeon Jang

Nonlinear Program Repeat-Viewing Patterns and Their Determinants
Yunjin Choi, Bong Gyou Lee

Networked Huawei Agendas During the U.S.-China Trade Conflict: The Interrelationships Between Huawei, the News Media, and Public Tweets
Zahedur Rahman Arman

“Spectacular” User Subjectivities on Instagram: A Discursive Interface Analysis
Lydia Kollyri, Dimitra L. Milioni

Imagining Algorithms to Believe In: Comparing OkCupid and Tinder Users’ Perceptions of Algorithms to Uncover Alternatives to Algorithmic Exploitation on Dating Apps
Gregory Narr

Is Open Communication Scholarship a Promise or Peril? Preliminary Interviews With Qualitative Communication Scholars
Rukun Zhang, Jiankun Gong, Weipeng Hou, Amira Firdaus, Jinghong Xu

The Effects of Narratives and Disclosure Timings on Reducing Stigma and Implicit Bias Against People Suffering From Mental Illness
Sushma Kumble, Fuyuan Shen

Between Tradition and Modernity: Representation of Women in Family Planning Campaigns in Pakistan
Farah Azhar

BOOK REVIEWS

Valérie Bélair-Gagnon and Nikki Usher (Eds.), Journalism Research That Matters
Adina Schneeweis

Kate Fortmueller, Hollywood Shutdown: Production, Distribution, and Exhibition in the Time of COVID
Nanor Vosgueritchian

Priscilla Hobbs (Ed.), Interpreting and Experiencing Disney: Mediating the Mouse
Noah Zweig

Gino Canella, Activist Media: Documenting Movements and Networked Solidarity
Patricia Aufderheide

Ralph Tench, Juan Meng, and Ángeles Moreno (Eds.), Strategic Communication in a Global Crisis: National and International Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic
Marina Rospitasari, Hersintus Suwenda Syahsuyoso, Ivana Pascalia Sooai

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Larry Gross, Editor
Arlene Luck, Founding Managing Editor  
Kady Bell-Garcia, Managing Editor
Chi Zhang, Managing Editor, Special Sections

Please note that according to the latest Google Scholar statistics, IJoC ranks 9th among all Humanities journals and 9th among all Communications journals in the world — demonstrating the viability of open access scholarly publication at the highest level. 

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on Precarious Migrants in a Sharing Economy

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on
Precarious Migrants in a Sharing Economy


How does enabling collective action in a sharing economy contribute to solving the challenge of migrant governance and care work in precarious contexts?

Despite claims that societies are increasingly affected by the sharing economy, there remains a paucity of evidence on the impact of sharing economic systems for marginalized communities. Some scholars argue that the sharing economy marked the emergence of an ad hoc governance structure, including joint efforts from the public sector, NGOs, private firms, civil society, and migrant organizations, to tackle the issues relating to integrating precarious migrants. On the other hand, the complexity of multi-level governance systems and collaborations can generate greater uncertainty about migrant management and care.

Guest-edited by Amanda Alencar and Yijing Wang, this Special Section on Precarious Migrants in a Sharing Economy aims at advancing knowledge on how collective action is enabled in the sharing economy in support of precarious migrants in a diversity of contexts and situations, and the extent to which technological innovations, such as digital media, data systems and networks, help promote migrants’ socioeconomic participation, citizenship, and well-being in a sharing framework.

The contributions to this Special Section are valuable at this point in time given the complex and rapidly changing circumstances of migration as a global and regional phenomenon, which not only represents an immense humanitarian and logistical challenge, but also poses a challenge to established governance structures. In addition, given the impact of the COVID-19 crisis at a global level, there is an even more pressing need to shed light on the potentialities and vulnerabilities of digital responses and initiatives put in place by local organizations, migrants, and volunteers to fill the gaps in states’ asylum and integration systems during the pandemic.

We invite you to read these articles that published in the International Journal of Communication on November 21, 2022. Please log into ijoc.org to read the papers of interest. We look forward to your feedback! 

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Precarious Migrants in a Sharing Economy: Collective Action, Organizational Communication, and Digital Technologies—Introduction 
Amanda Alencar, Yijing Wang

The Rise of Platformized Governance in China: Migration, Technology, and Social Integration 
Sun Ping

Looking Good or Doing Good? A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Employee Perception of Corporate Refugee Support
Yijing Wang

On-Demand Migrants: Entrepreneurialism, Platformization, and Migration in Brazil
Sofia Cavalcanti Zanforlin, Rafael Grohmann

Digital Solidarity and Ethical Tech for Refugees: Why We Need to Care More and Code Less 
Sara Marino 

Data Literacy as an Emerging Challenge in the Migration/Refugee Context: A Critical Exploration of Communication Efforts Around “Refugee Apps” 
Dennis Nguyen, Sergül Nguyen

#Migrantes on TikTok: Exploring Platformed Belongings
Daniela Jaramillo-Dent, Amanda Alencar, Yan Asadchy

#Nosomosdesertores: Activism and Narratives of the Cuban Diaspora on Twitter   
Denise Maria Cogo, Deborah Rodríguez Santos

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Larry Gross, Editor
Arlene Luck, Founding Managing Editor  
Kady Bell-Garcia, Managing Editor
Chi Zhang, Managing Editor, Special Sections
Amanda Alencar and Yijing Wang, Guest Editors

Please note that according to the latest Google Scholar statistics, IJoC ranks 9th among all Humanities journals and 9th among all Communications journals in the world — demonstrating the viability of open access scholarly publication at the highest level.

International Journal of Communication invites you to read these 38 papers that published in October

International Journal of Communication invites you to read these 38 papers that published in October

The International Journal of Communication is pleased to announce the publication of 38 papers in OCTOBER 2022, which includes the “Special Section on Unsettled Debts: 1968 and the Problem of Historical Memory.” To access these papers, Ctrl+Click on the titles below for direct hyperlinking or go to ijoc.org to read the Special Section.

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ARTICLES

Environmental Mobilizations Through Online Networks: An Analysis of Environmental Activism on Turkey’s Twittersphere
Burak Doğu, Hayriye Özen, Begüm Pasin

Populists or Influencers? The Use of Facebook Videos by Populist Leaders
Alessandro Gandini, Andrea Ceron, Patrizio Lodetti

Public Relations in Mongolia: The Missing Part on the Global Public Relations Map
Milen Filipov, Aimira Dybyssova

Colonizing the Home as Data-Source: Investigating the Language of Amazon Skills and Google Actions
Louise Marie Hurel, Nick Couldry

Community Storytelling Networks and Empowerment of Migrant Domestic Workers: A Communication Infrastructure Approach
Jeffry Oktavianus, Wan-Ying Lin  

Environmental Communication at a Time of Planetary Crisis: Five Theoretical and Analytical Resources for Academic Research and Practice
Trish Morgan 

BLM Movement Frames Among the Muted Voices: Actor-Generated Infographics on Instagram During #BlackoutTuesday
Kirsten M. Weber, Holly A. V. Smith, Bradley Madsen, Tisha Dejmanee, Zulfia Zaher 

Engagement With Social Media Posts in Experimental and Naturalistic Settings: How Do Message Incongruence and Incivility Influence Commenting?
Xudong Yu, Teresa Gil-López, Cuihua Shen, Magdalena Wojcieszak

International Students’ Direct and Parasocial Contact and Attitudes Toward American Host Nationals: The Mediating Role of Cultural Identification
Teri Terigele, Yan Bing Zhang, Huang Jiang 

Differing Influences of Political Communication: Examining How News Use and Conversation Shape Political Engagement in Nigeria
Oluseyi Adegbola, Sherice Gearhart, Bingbing Zhang

Building Ideal Workplaces: Labor, Affect, and Identity in Tech for Good Projects
Karina Rider

Russian Popular Geopolitics During Crisis and War
Yasemin Y. Celikkol

Anger Yes, Boycott No: Third-Person Effects and the China–U.S. Trade War
Ven-hwei Lo, Liangwen Kuo, Ran Wei, Zongya Li

Ego-Network Difference, Political Communication, and Affective Polarization During Political Contention 
Francis L. F. Lee 

The Impact of Digital Media on Daily Rhythms: Intrapersonal Diversification and Interpersonal Differentiation
Yixin Zhou, Jonathan J. H. Zhu

Social Media Use and Political Consumerism During the U.S.-China Trade Conflict: An Application of the O-S-R-O-R Model
Yanqin Lu, Tanja Vierrether, Qianxi Wu, Morgan Durfee, Peiqin Chen

Testing Risk Information Seeking and Avoidance in the Context of HPV Vaccination: A Comparison of Disease Risks and Vaccine-Related Risks
Soo Jung Hong, Yungwook Kim

Job Satisfaction and Social Media Use: Cognitive Reflection and Journalists’ Utilization in Egypt and the United States
Rasha El-Ibiary, Brian Calfano    

Imagining 5G Networks: Infrastructure and Public Accountability
Robin Mansell, Jean-Christophe Plantin

Mediatized Skill: How Capabilities With Application Software Are Collectively Performed, Perceived, and Organized as Part of Contemporary Media Practices
Frédérik Lesage

Older Adults and “the Biggest Lie on the Internet”: From Ignoring Social Media Policies to the Privacy Paradox
Jonathan A. Obar, Anne Oeldorf-Hirsch

Gender-Based Hate Speech: Contributions to the Global Policy Debate From Latin America
Paulina Godinez, Stephanie Rico, Katharine Sarikakis


FEATURE

The Copyright Claims Board: Good News or Bad News for Communication Scholars? 
Patricia Aufderheide, Aram Sinnreich 


BOOK REVIEWS

Johanna Sumiala, Mediated Death
Tal Morse

Jacob Mchangama, Free Speech: A History From Socrates to Social Media 
Sue Curry Jansen 

Jérémy Vachet, Fantasy, Neoliberalism and Precariousness: Coping Strategies in the Cultural Industries
Zhang Keren

Mazyar Lotfalian, What People do With Images: Aesthetics, Politics and the Production of Iranian Visual Culture in Transnational Circuits 
Babak Rahimi 

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Larry Gross, Editor
Arlene Luck, Founding Managing Editor  
Kady Bell-Garcia, Managing Editor
Chi Zhang, Managing Editor, Special Sections

Please note that according to the latest Google Scholar statistics, IJoC ranks 9th among all Humanities journals and 9th among all Communications journals in the world — demonstrating the viability of open access scholarly publication at the highest level.

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on Unsettled Debts: 1968 and the Problem of Historical Memory

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on Unsettled Debts: 1968 and the Problem of Historical Memory


How might scholars of communication orient to the contested past in order to foster decisive action in the present?

Back in 2018, the 50th anniversary of 1968 gave rise to a small industry devoted to commemoration. Scholars and journalists revisited that year’s insurgencies in dozens of essays and books, activists paid tribute to its emancipatory legacy in the streets, and companies exploited it on our screens. In one egregious display, Dodge Ram used an excerpt from a 1968 speech by Martin Luther King, Jr., to narrate a Super Bowl truck commercial. Within hours, a hijacked version of the ad began circulating online, featuring the same speech but using an alternate excerpt, in which King denounced consumer society. Such correctives defend the radicalism of an era that is distant yet reverberant.

With each correction, however, we are reminded that history is more than a record for us to set straight. It is a process of production in which we participate, where even our principled longings in the present can become obstacles to confronting our co-implication with the past.

Guest-edited by Clare O’Connor and featuring a Foreword by Robin D.G. Kelley, this Special Section on Unsettled Debts: 1968 and the Problem of Historical Memory considers how we might revisit the “spirit of ’68” without succumbing to distorted forms of memory such as nostalgia and myth. Based on the proceedings of a 2018 conference dedicated to this theme, the essays in this Section analyze media objects and moments from 1968 that have been activated in the service of contemporary social movements, obscured through superficial citation, or omitted from the dominant record altogether.

We invite you to read these articles that published in the International Journal of Communication on October 5, 2022. Please log into ijoc.org to read the papers of interest. We look forward to your feedback! 

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Unsettled Debts: 1968 and the Problem of Historical Memory—Foreword 
Robin D. G. Kelley

Unsettled Debts: 1968 and the Problem of Historical Memory—Introduction  
Clare O’Connor

“Thái Bình Means Peace”: (Re)positioning South Vietnamese Exchange Students’ Activism in the Asian American Movement  
Ly Thúy Nguyễn 

Con Che? The Specter of Communism in the 1968 Chicano Blowouts 
Magally Miranda, Efren Michael Lopez

The American Indian Movement and the Politics of Nostalgia: Indigenous Representation From Wounded Knee to Standing Rock  
Clementine Bordeaux

Reborn as Fida’i: The Palestinian Revolution and the (Re)Making of an Icon  
Loubna Qutami 

Lost in Citation: Afterlives of the 1968 Memphis Sanitation Strike  
Clare O’Connor 

The Limits of Smooth Legacies: 1968, Feminist History, and the Tradition of Athlete Activism: An Interview With Amira Rose Davis  
Courtney M. Cox 

Afterlives of Tlatelolco: Memory, Contested Space, and Collective Imagination  
Paulina Lanz

Once Lost, Painfully Present: Maya Angelou’s Blacks, Blues, Black! (1968)
Adrien Sebro 

The Sociotechnical Imaginaries of 1968 
Andrea Alarcon, Soledad Altrudi, Frances Corry, MC Forelle

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Larry Gross, Editor
Arlene Luck, Founding Managing Editor  
Kady Bell-Garcia, Managing Editor
Chi Zhang, Managing Editor, Special Sections
Clare O’Connor, Guest Editor

Please note that according to the latest Google Scholar statistics, IJoC ranks 9th among all Humanities journals and 9th among all Communications journals in the world — demonstrating the viability of open access scholarly publication at the highest level.

International Journal of Communication invites you to read these 22 papers that published in September

International Journal of Communication invites you to read these 22 papers that published in September

The International Journal of Communication is pleased to announce the publication of 22 papers in SEPTEMBER 2022. To access these papers, Ctrl+Click on the titles below for direct hyperlinking.
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ARTICLES

Why Do Fact-Checking Organizations Go Beyond Fact-Checking? A Leap Toward Media and Information Literacy Education
Mehmet Fatih Çömlekçi 

Press “Taboos” and Media Policy: West German Trade Unions and the Urge to Gain Media Attention During the Era of Press Concentration
Maria Löblich, Niklas Venema

Localizing Graphic Design in a Global Media Environment: A Visual Social Semiotic Analysis of Vogue 
Melissa McMullen

Representation and Recognition: The Perceptions of Finnish and Spanish Viewers of Their Media Ecosystems and Public Service Newscasts
María Lamuedra Graván, Elisa Alonso, Marko Ala-Fossi

Extending the Reminiscence Bump Effect in Nostalgic Advertising from the United States to South Korea 
Ilyoung Ju, Eunjin (Anna) Kim, Susan Bluck, Jong Woo Jun

Sincerity Over Accuracy: Epistemic Preferences and the Persuasiveness of Uncivil and Simple Rhetoric 
Chiara Vargiu, Alessandro Nai

Media and Grassroots Activism for the Achievement of Sustainable Development Goals: A Study of Postcolonial Macau From 2002 to 2021
Min Xu

Comparative Perspectives on the Link Between News Media Consumption and Attitudes Toward Immigrants: Evidence From Europe, the United States, and Colombia
David De Coninck, Willem Joris, Maria Duque, Seth J. Schwartz, Leen d’Haenens

The Rear Window Effect: How Users Respond to Political Discussions and Persuasive Discourses in Social Media
Beatriz Jordá, Manuel Goyanes

From Fork Hands to Microchips: An Analysis of Trending #CovidVaccine Content on TikTok
Monique Lewis, Susan Grantham

Engagement in Newspaper Newsrooms: A View From the Editors in Chief
Cristóbal Benavides, Alfonso Vara, Alfonso Sánchez-Tabernero, Juan-Ignacio Brito

“Let’s Check it Seriously”: Localizing Fact-Checking Practice in China
Yusi Liu, Ruiming Zhou


FEATURE

Home-No-Home: Academic Immigrants in the Fields of Communication
Dafna Lemish

BOOK REVIEWS

Darryl Hocking, The Impact of Everyday Language Change on the Practices of Visual Artists 
Qiuying Zhao 

H. Dan O’Hair and Mary John O’Hair (Eds.), Communicating Science in Times of Crisis: COVID-19 Pandemic
Ronald Douglas Aiken II

Robyn Blakeman, Advertising Design by Medium: A Visual and Verbal Approach
Meimei Xiang, Renhua Zheng

Tiffany Petricini, Friendship and Technology: A Philosophical Approach to Computer-Mediated Communication
Miao Hao

Silvia Pettini, The Translation of Realia and Irrealia in Game Localization: Culture-Specificity Between Realism and Fictionality
Chenjing Li

Susanna Paasonen, Feona Attwood, Alan Mckee, John Mercer, and Clarissa Smith, Objectification: On the Difference between Sex and Sexism
Di Wang

Tero Karppi, Urs Stäheli, Clara Wieghorst, and Lea P. Zierott, Undoing Networks
Yao Yao

Katarzyna Kopecka-Piech and Bartłomiej Łódzki (Eds.), The Covid-19 Pandemic as a Challenge for Media and Communication Studies
Wenliang Chen

Amit Pinchevski, Echo
Jérôme Bourdon

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Larry Gross, Editor
Arlene Luck, Founding Managing Editor  
Kady Bell-Garcia, Managing Editor
Chi Zhang, Managing Editor, Special Sections

Please note that according to the latest Google Scholar statistics, IJoC ranks 9th among all Humanities journals and 9th among all Communications journals in the world — demonstrating the viability of open access scholarly publication at the highest level.