IJoC Publishes 25 papers in August 2018

Announcements header

The International Journal Communication is pleased to announce the publication of 25 papers in August 2018 including a Special Section on Political Scandale=s. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking, or go to ijoc.org. 

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ARTICLES

Bringing the Mountain to the Prophet: Marshall McLuhan’s Mythology in the Anthropocene
Niall P. Stephens

Becoming Iconic
Barry King 

Social Issues and TV Scripted Fiction: An Exploration of Fans’ Feedback in Spain
Deborah Castro, Joseph D. Straubhaar

Rethinking the Venezuelan Media Presidency: Populism/Authoritarianism and “Spectacular Modernity
Noah Zweig

The Bounded Embodiment of Fandom in China: Recovering Shifting Media Experiences and Fan Participation Through an Oral History of Animation-Comics-Games Lovers
Yiyi Yin, Xie Zhuoxiao

Implicit and Explicit Control: Modeling the Effect of Internet Censorship on Political Protest in China
Jiayin Lu, Yupei Zhao

Networks of Play and Resentment: Emotionally Mobilized Protests in Macau in the Internet Age
Zhongxuan Lin

Theoretical Frames and Institutional Constraints: A Synopsis About Chilean Communication Research in the 21st Century
Claudia Lagos Lira

Attention in Business Press to the Diffusion of Attention Technologies, 1990–2017
Ronald E. Rice, Zane T. Hoffmann

The Media Event Build-Up Phase: A Site of Contestation and Counternarratives
Cerianne Robertson

Far-Right Parties in the European Union and Media Populism: A Comparative Analysis of 10 Countries During European Parliament Elections
Larisa Doroshenko

The Post-Truth Double-Helix: Reflexivity and Mistrust in Local Politics
Timothy Gibson

BOOK REVIEWS

Yu Hong, Networking China: The Digital Transformation of the Chinese Economy 
Menglu Lyu

Darin Barney, Gabriella Coleman, Christine Ross, Jonathan Sterne, Tamar Tembeck (Eds.), The Participatory Condition in the Digital Age
Aleena Chia

Theorizing the Future of Rhetoric and Posthumanism: Perspectives on Bodies that Learn Language and Objects that Have Agency
Emma Frances Bloomfield 

Grant Bollmer, Inhuman Networks: Social Media and the Archaeology of Connection
George Maier

Andre Cavalcante, Struggling for Ordinary: Media and Transgender Belonging in Everyday Life
Greg Niedt
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Larry Gross
Editor    

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

IJoC Publishes 18 papers in July 2018

Announcements header

The International Journal Communication is pleased to announce the publication of 18 papers in July 2018 including the Special Section on News Media & the Emotional Public Sphere as well as the Special Section on (Un)civil Society in Digital China. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking or go to ijoc.org. 

ARTICLES

Communication Theory After the Administered Society: The “Total Market” in the Writings of the Departamento Ecuménico de Investigaciones
Vicente Berdayes

“He’s Got His Own Sea”: Political Facebook Unfriending in the Personal Public Sphere
Nicholas A. John, Noam Gal

A New Women’s Work: Digital Interactions, Gender, and Social Network Sites
Angela M. Cirucci

Changing Center and Stagnant Periphery in Communication and Media Studies: National
Diversity of Major International Journals in the Field of Communication from 2013 to 2017

Marton Demeter

Winds of Change? BRICS as a Perspective in International Media Research
Afonso de Albuquerque, Diógenes Lycarião

The Idea of Europeanness: Perceptions of Erasmus Students in Turkey and The Netherlands
Zeynep Aksoy

Poor Information: How Economics Affects the Information Lives of Low-Income Individuals
James T. Hamilton, Fiona Morgan

Can the Internet Aid Democratic Consolidation? Online News and Legitimacy in Central
and Eastern Europe

Matthew Placek

Smartphones as Metamedia: A Framework for Identifying the Niches Structuring Smartphone Use
Lee Humphreys, Veronika Karnowski, Thilo von Pape

Selfies and Cultural Events: Mixed Methods for the Study of Selfies in Context
Gemma San Cornelio, Antoni Roig

FEATURE

Making Implicit Methods Explicit: Trade Press Analysis in the Political Economy of Communication
Thomas F. Corrigan

BOOK REVIEWS

Robert E. Babe, Wilbur Schramm and Noam Chomsky Meet Harold Innis: Media, Power
and Democracy

Marcus Breen

Grant Bollmer, Inhuman Networks: Social Media and the Archaeology of Connection
J.J. Sylvia IV

Jody C. Baumgartner and Terri L. Towner (Eds.), The Internet and the 2016 Presidential Campaign
Fatemeh Kamali Chirani

The Ambivalences of the Citizen Marketer Concept: A Response to Tabassum Ruhi Khan
Joel Penney

Ulla Carlsson and David Goldberg (Eds.), The Legacy of Peter Forsskål: 250 Years of Freedom of Expression
Andrei G. Richter 

Keyword Up!
Jack Bratich

Paul Feigenbaum, Collaborative Imagination: Earning Activism through Literacy Education
Kellie Brownlee

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Larry Gross
Editor       

 Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on Political Scandals

International Journal of Communication
Publishes a Special Section on Political Scandals

This Special Section on “Political Scandals as a Democratic Challenge” brings together seven original papers (plus an editorial introduction) on current international research in the area of political scandals. The complexity of these processes underlines the need for critical, interdisciplinary research, and this Special Section includes a systematic review of research examining the various effects of political scandals, and a paper analyzing the psychological reactions of politicians involved in scandals.

Political Scandals

 

The Section focuses on the primary question: What are the roles–and effects–of mediated political scandals on democratic processes?

A central topic in several of the articles is the contradictory status of journalism as an important “watchdog” institution, holding political leaders to account, and media institutions as a “scandal machine” that ignores serious political misdeeds and inflates the importance of trivial norm violations. Other papers discuss how politicians and power holders may provoke and use staged mediated scandals in order to influence the public agenda and smear competitors. The complexity of such scandalization processes underlines the need of critical, interdisciplinary research, and this Special Section includes a systematic review of research examining the various effects of political scandals and a paper analyzing the psychological reactions of politicians involved in scandals.

We invite you to read these eight articles that just published in the International Journal of Communication on August 6, 2018. Please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below to hyperlink to the papers of interest.

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Political Scandals as a Democratic Challenge: From Important Revelations to Provocations, Trivialities, and Neglect. Introduction
Sigurd Allern, Christian von Sikorski

Blunders, Scandals, and Strategic Communication in U.S. Foreign Policy: Benghazi vs. 9/11
Robert Entman, Sarah Stonbely

Political Scandals Under Responsive Authoritarianism: The Case of the Bo Xilai Trial in China
Francis L. F. Lee

“Assassination Campaigns”: Corruption Scandals and News Media Instrumentation
Paolo Mancini

The New Normal: Scandals as a Standard Feature of Political Life in Nordic Countries
Ester Pollack, Sigurd Allern, Anu Kantola, Mark Ørsten

The Aftermath of Political Scandals: A Meta-Analysis
Christian von Sikorski

Powerful and Powerless: Psychological Reactions of Norwegian Politicians Exposed in Media Scandals
Kim Edgar Karlsen, Fanny Duckert

Hidden Traps: An Essay on Scandals — Commentary
Hans Mathias Kepplinger

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Larry Gross
Editor 

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Sigurd Allern, Christian von Sikorski
Guest Editors

IJoC Publisher Special Section on News Media and the Emotional Public Sphere

International Journal of Communication

Publishes a Special Section on
News Media and the Emotional Publi
c Sphere 

This Special Section on “News Media and the Emotional Public Sphere” brings together six original papers (plus an editorial introduction) on current research on news media and emotions and their influence on the dynamics of the public sphere. The concept of the emotional dimension of the political public sphere sheds light on the mobilizing power of civic reactions to anti-austerity measures, immigration flows, or fake news. In addition, media framing of those reactions plays a crucial role in contemporary social and political life.

This Special Section focuses on the twofold primary question: What is the role of emotions in the production and reception of news, and what are the implications of emotion-related journalistic practices and narratives for the Public Sphere?

News media

These articles investigate a wide range of topics, such as freedom of speech, online politics, protest coverage, the European financial crisis, the value of emotionality in the news, and the sharing of news. All six articles have important implications for the understanding of how news media shape the way emotions are framed and communicated to the public.

Furthermore, this Special Sections highlights the importance of the emotional dimension of the public sphere to understand why traditional, rationalistic perspectives on both the media and the public sphere do not suffice to capture the complexities of social and political life in contemporary democracies.

To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking or go to ijoc.org.  We look forward to your feedback.

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News Media and the Emotional Public Sphere – Introduction
Omar V. Rosas, Javier Serrano-Puche 

The Emotional Public Sphere and Its Importance: Freedom of Speech as a Case Study
Barry Richards

Public Sphere Participation Online: The Ambiguities of Affect – Commentary
Peter Dahlgren

Toward a Typology of Mediated Anger: Routine Coverage of Protest and Political Emotion
Karin Wahl-Jorgensen

The Emotional Economy of the European Financial Crisis in the UK Press
Tereza Capelos, Theofanis Exadaktylos, Stavroula Chrona, Maria Poulopoulou 

Strategic Avoidance and Strategic Use: A Look Into Spanish Online Journalists’ Attitudes Toward Emotions in Reporting
Omar V. Rosas

Audience as Medium: Motivations and Emotions in News Sharing
Alberto Dafonte-Gómez

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Larry Gross
Editor                                             

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Omar V. Rosas, Javier Serrano-Puche
Guest Editors

IJoC Publishes Special Section on (Un)civil Society in Digital China

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on (Un)civil Society in Digital China  

Is China becoming an uncivil society? How have state policies and online incivility contributed to new forms of intra-societal conflict? How can civility (or incivility) be reconceptualized to facilitate comparative analysis across countries, regime types, and cultures?

The International Journal of Communication is delighted to announce the publication of a new Special Section on “(Un)civil Society in Digital China: Incivility, Fragmentation, and Political Stability” on May 8, 2018 which includes five articles from international scholars.

China fingerAi Weiwei, “Study of Perspective, Tiananmen.” Source: Public Delivery

Co-edited by Min Jiang and Ashley Esarey, this Special Section on (Un)civil Society in Digital China explores how the Chinese Internet is utilized by an authoritarian state to concentrate and solidify its power in the name of civility, rationality and order and considers how expressions of incivility online delegitimize regime critics and create ultra-nationalist identities.

Moving beyond definitions of civility (or incivility) based on democratic norms of deliberation and reciprocity, this Special Section’s theoretical introduction argues that civility should be distinguished from politeness and founded in respect for others’ communicative rights, including the right to self-expression in pursuit of social justice. These conceptual modifications can help to facilitate contextualized and comparative studies of civility and incivility across regions and polities.

To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking  or go to ijoc.org.  We look forward to your feedback.

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Uncivil Society in Digital China: Incivility, Fragmentation, and Political Stability
Min Jiang, University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Ashley Esarey, University of Alberta

Demobilizing the Emotions of Online Activism in China: A Civilizing Process
Guobin Yang, University of Pennsylvania

Withering Gongzhi: Cyber Criticism of Chinese Public Intellectuals
Rongbin Han, University of Georgia

Slogans and Slurs, Misogyny and Nationalism: A Case Study of Anti-Japanese Sentiment by Chinese Netizens in Contentious Social Media Comments
Jason Q. Ng, Citizen Lab, University of Toronto
Eileen Le Han, Michigan State University

Wenming Bu Wenming: The Socialization of Incivility in Postdigital China
Gabriele de Seta, Academia Sinica Institute of Ethnology, Taiwan

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Larry Gross
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Min Jiang, Ashley Esarey
Guest Editors

IJoC Publishes 20 Papers in APRIL 2018

Announcements header

International Journal of Communication invites you to read these 20 papers that published in APRIL

The International Journal Communication is pleased to announce the publication of 20 papers in April 2018 including the Special Section on Nuit Debout. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking  or go to ijoc.org.  We look forward to your feedback!
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ARTICLES

Power Pressures and Pocketbook Concerns: Perceptions of Organizational Influences on News Content in the Television Industry
Rita Colistra

The Agency Makes the (Online) News World go Round: The Impact of News Agency Content on Print and Online News
Jelle Boumans, Damian Trilling, Rens Vliegenthart, Hajo Boomgaarden

Live From New York, It’s Trump on Twitter! The Effect of Engaging With Saturday Night Live on Perceptions of Authenticity and the Salience of Trait Ratings
Amy B. Becker

Echo Chambers in Parliamentary Twitter Networks: The Catalan Case
Marc Esteve Del Valle, Rosa Borge Bravo

Who Speaks for the Past? Social Media, Social Memory, and the Production of Historical Knowledge in Contemporary China
Jun Liu

Studying Real-Time Audience Responses to Political Messages: A New Research Agenda
Stephen Coleman, Giles Moss, Alvaro Martinez-Perez

Entertainment, News, and Income Inequality: How Colombian Media Shape Perceptions of Income Inequality and Why It Matters
David Coppini, German Alvarez, Hernando Rojas

The Ecological Dynamics of Organizational Change: Density Dependence in the Rate of Weibo Adoption by Populations of News Organizations
Yu Xu

Examining the Connectedness of Connective Action: The Participant-Initiated Facebook Pages in Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement
Yin Zhang, Francis L. F. Lee

Political Participation in Hong Kong: The Roles of News Media and Online Alternative Media
Chuanli Xia, Fei Shen


BOOK REVIEWS

Kalu N. Kalu, Citizenship: Identity, Institutions, and the Postmodern Challenge
Sonia Pedro Sebastiao

Jian Xu, Media Events in Web 2.0 China: Interventions of Online Activism
Mingxiao Sui

Adrienne Russell, Journalism as Activism: Recoding Media Power
Yazan Badran

Domesticating the Global: Manga Beyond Japan
James Lee

Dániel Z. Kádár, Politeness, Impoliteness and Ritual: Maintaining the Moral Order in Iinterpersonal Interaction
Xiaoyu Lai

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Larry Gross
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

IJoC Publishes a Special Section on Nuit Debout

The International Journal of Communication is delighted to announce the publication of a new Special Section on “Nuit Debout” on April 30, 2018

The International Journal of Communication is delighted to announce the publication of a new Special Section on “Nuit Debout” on April 30, 2018

This Special Section “The French Nuit Debout Movement: Communication Struggles and Tactics” brings together four research articles, an interview with a celebrity journalist-activist filmmaker, and the guest editor’s essay conjuncturally contextualizing the movement as a critique of everyday (-night) life.

The Nuit Debout social movement that launched in 2016 is perhaps the most remarkable Left French movement since the May 1968 revolts and bears important similarities to and contrasts with recent movements such as Occupy and Les Indignados. Triggered by widespread indignation at a labor reform law, this “movement of the square” quickly became much more: a prefigurative participatory democracy as well as social politics—a performative critique of the status quo. It met nightly for two months in Paris’s Place de la République, spreading to hundreds of French cities and abroad.

Nuit Debout photo

The contributions in this Special Section explore the question of Nuit Debout’s distinctiveness but also its communication features that share a transnational repertoire of contention. They contribute revealing and challenging case studies. They provide conceptual and broad theoretical developments, implicitly and explicitly questioning the growing body of research on social movements (especially of the squares and especially with regard to uses and challenges of new communication tools, strategies and tactics). These papers help us understand new especially digital tools in repertoires of contention and repression.

More specifically, contributors traverse a broad terrain of communication practices and theory: hackers and makers of apps; out-of-the-cloud communication for internal organization and prefigurative group political communication, as well as outward broadcasting; a theory of a renewed activist journalism; the role or influence of celebrities; theoretical reflection on the emotional dimensions of storytelling in alternative journalism and in the cohesion-building of sustained collective action; the perceived and hidden (i.e., mediated) temporality and chronology of movements’ moves and rejuvenations, their composition, decomposition and re-composition; the historical and cultural reach of participants’ knowledges, tools and aspirations; police and counter-protesters’ strategies; and the movement’s specific critique of representative democracy and everyday (through a counter-production of everynight) life.

To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking  or go to ijoc.org.  We look forward to your feedback.

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The Nuit Debout Movement: Communication, Politics, and the Counter-Production of “Everynight Life” — Introduction
Jayson Harsin

Strange Speech: Structures of Listening in Nuit Debout, Occupy, and 15M
Jessica Feldman

Nuit Debout, Media Technologies, and Prototyping Change (Feature)
Adrienne Russell

Toward a Creative Activism with a Sense of Humor: An Interview with François Ruffin
Serge Chaumier

Activist Reflexivity and Mediated Violence: Putting the Policing of Nuit Debout in Context
Anna Feigenbaum, Patrick McCurdy

From Social Movement to Social Rest: Recuperation in Occupy Wall Street, Nuit Debout, and Other Contemporary Struggles
Jack Bratich

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Larry Gross
Editor    

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Jayson Harsin
Guest Editor