International Journal of Communication 
Publishes a Special Section on Global Digital Culture

Global Digital Culture

Is There a Global Digital Culture?

Contributors debate this question in this Special Issue co-published with CARGC Press. Authors initially presented this research at the second Biennial Symposium of the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication (CARGC) at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania in April 2016.

In the 1980s and 1990s, the question “Is there a global culture?” fueled heated debates as intellectual opponents grappled with the social, political, economic and cultural consequences of globalization. Guest-edited by Marwan M. Kraidy, this Special Section by global communication scholars revisits the discussion on global culture in light of the digital revolution. The articles that follow do not pretend to provide a comprehensive answer to the existence or lack thereof of a global digital culture. Rather, they consider this question as an intellectual provocation to revisit how the universal relates to the particular, the global to the local, the digital to the material. Questions guiding these articles include:

How do networks transmute individual autonomy and the sovereignty of the body?  How is digital culture fomenting disjuncture across the globe in dissident, marginal, or rogue formations?

To what extent have boundaries between public and private, visible and invisible, shifted in the digital era?

How is the digital affecting the ways people work and play, how they experience and judge beauty, and how they protest?

Most fundamentally, does digitization herald a new chapter in how we understand ourselves?

We invite you to read these articles that published in the International Journal of Communication on September 30, 2017.  Please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking to the papers of interest.

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Convergence and Disjuncture in Global Digital Culture ― An Introduction
Marwan M. Kraidy, University of Pennsylvania

The Cultures of Anonymity and Violence in the Mexican Blogosphere
Hector Amaya, University of Virginia

Uploading the News After Coming Down From the Mountain: The FARC’s Experiment with Online Television in Cuba, 2012–2016
Alexander L. Fattal, Pennsylvania State University

Video Games and the Asymmetry of Global Cultural Flows: The Game Industry and Game Culture in Iran and the Czech Republic
Vit Šisler, Jaroslav Švelch, Josef Šlerka, Charles University

Digital Platform as a Double-Edged Sword: How to Interpret Cultural Flows in the Platform Era
Dal Yong Jin, Simon Fraser University

Poor Images, Ad-Hoc Archives, Artists’ Rights: The Scrappy Beauties of Handmade Digital Culture
Laura U. Marks, Simon Fraser University

The Lurker and the Politics of Knowledge in Data Culture
Olga Goriunova, Royal Holloway University of London

Digital Labor Studies Go Global: Toward a Digital Decolonial Turn
Antonio Casilli, Telecom Paris-Tech
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Larry Gross
Editor

 Arlene Luck
 
Managing Editor

 Marwan M. Kraidy
Guest Editor 

Announcements header

The International Journal of Communication has published 17 papers in August 2017. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below or go to ijoc.org.

ARTICLES

Social Media as a Platform for Incessant Political Communication: A Case Study of Modi’s “Clean India” Campaign
Usha M. Rodrigues, Michael Niemann

The Importance of Cultural Proximity in the Success of Turkish Dramas in Qatar
Miriam Berg 

Race and Police Brutality: The Importance of Media Framing
Kim Fridkin, Amanda Wintersieck, Jillian Courey, Joshua Thompson

Do Arabs Really Read Less? “Cultural Tools” and “More Knowledgeable Others” as Determinants of Book Reliance in Six Arab Countries
Justin D. Martin, Ralph J. Martins, Shageaa Naqvi

Resounding News: The Acoustic Conventions of Israeli Newscasts
Hadar Levy, Amit Pinchevski

Are Half of Latin Americans Not Online? A Four-Country Study of Reasons for Internet Non-Adoption
Hernan Galperin

The Defining Approaches and Practical Paradox of Sensitive Data: An Investigation of Data Protection Laws in 92 Countries and Regions and 200 Data Breaches in the World
Min Wang, Zuosu Jiang

Effects of Message Repetition and Negativity on Credibility Judgments and Political Attitudes
Nicole Ernst, Rinaldo Kühne, Werner Wirth

Who’s Bad? Attitudes Toward Resettlers From the Post-Soviet South Versus Other Nations in the Russian Blogosphere
Svetlana S. Bodrunova, Olessia Koltsova, Sergey Koltcov, Sergey Nikolenko  

“We Are All Fighters”: The Transmedia Marketing of Difference in the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC)
Jennifer McClearen

The Cultural Cold War Goes “Vulgar”: Radio Serial Melodrama in Post–Korean War South Korea, 1956–1960
Bohyeong Kim

 Personal and Public Levels of Political Incivility
Ashley Muddiman

A Noneventful Social Movement: The Occupy Wall Street Movement’s Struggle Over Privately Owned Public Space
Hao Cao

Access to Rabat: De Jure Policies and De Facto Realities in Moroccan Newspaper Coverage of the February 20 Movement and Constitutional Reforms, 2011–2012
Bradley C. Freeman

“I Don’t Care About Politics, I Just Like That Guy!” Affective Disposition and Political Attributes in Information Processing of Political Talk Shows
Carina Weinmann, Franziska S. Roth, Frank M. Schneider, Tanja Krämer, Frederic R. Hopp, Melanie J. Bindl, Peter Vorderer

How Political Conflict Shapes Online Spaces: A Comparison of Climate Change Hyperlink Networks in the United States and Germany
Thomas Häussler, Silke Adam, Hannah Schmid-Petri, Ueli Reber

Credibility Gaps and Public Opinion in a Competitive Media Environment: The Case of Arab Satellite TV News in Lebanon
Erik C. Nisbet, Magdalena Saldana, Thomas Johnson, Guy Golan, Anita Day

FEATURES

What’s the Difference With “Difference”? Equity, Communication, and the Politics of Difference
Ralina L. Joseph

 

Thank you for your continuing interest in the work that IJoC publishes. We look forward to your comments!

Larry Gross                                                   
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

 

Announcements header

The International Journal of Communication has published 11 papers in JULY 2017. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below or go to ijoc.org.

ARTICLES

What Communication Scholars Write About: An Analysis of 80 Years of Research in High-Impact Journals
Elisabeth Günther, Emese Domahidi

The Morality and Political Antagonisms of Neoliberal Discourse: Campbell Brown and the Corporatization of Educational Justice
Leon A. Salter, Sean Phelan

How Does Political Satire Influence Political Participation? Examining the Role of Counter- and Pro-Attitudinal Exposure, Anger, and Personal Issue Importance
Hsuan-Ting Chen, Chen Gan, Ping Sun

Residual and Resurgent Protestantism in the American Media (and Political) Imaginary
Stewart M. Hoover

Examining the Relationship Between Presumed Influence of U.S. News About China and the Support for the Chinese Government’s Global Public Relations Campaigns
Ran Wei, Ven-hwei Lo, Guy Golan

Framing Political News in the Chilean Press: The Persistence of the Conflict Frame
Maria Elena Gronemeyer, William Porath

Does Receiving or Providing Social Support on Facebook Influence Life Satisfaction? Stress as Mediator and Self-Esteem as Moderator
Yixin Chen, Richard S. Bello

U.S. Embassy Support for Hollywood’s Global Dominance: Cultural Imperialism Redux
Paul Moody

Framing Climate Change: A Content Analysis of Chinese Mainstream Newspapers from 2005 to 2015
Jingjing Han, Shaojing Sun, Yanqin Lu

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Jason Stanley, How Propaganda Works
Oliver Boyd-Barrett

Paul Lynch and Nathaniel Rivers (Eds.), Thinking with Bruno Latour in Rhetoric and Composition
Maia Nichols

 

Thank you for your continuing interest in the work that IJoC publishes.

Larry Gross                                                   
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

 

Announcements header

The International Journal of Communication has published 26 papers in JUNE 2017, including four rebuttal “Features” that engage in a lively exchange from an article that published earlier this year. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below or go to ijoc.org.

 

ARTICLES

The Impact of Conventional and Novel Metaphors in News on Issue Viewpoint
Amber Boeynaems, Christian Burgers, Elly A. Konijn, Gerard J. Steen

Explaining the Islamic State’s Online Media Strategy: A Transmedia Approach
Sara Monaci   

Online Ultra-Orthodox Religious Communities as a Third Space: A Netnographic Study
Sarit Okun, Galit Nimrod

Egypt’s Jon Stewart: Humorous Political Satire and Serious Culture Jamming
Amal Ibrahim, Nahed Eltantawy

Open Privacy Badges for Digital Policy Literacy
Karen Louise Smith, Leslie Regan Shade, Tamara Shepherd

Constructing National Identity Online: The Case Study of #IranJeans on Twitter
Aya Yadlin-Segal

Narrative Persuasion in Historical Films: Examining the Importance of Prior Knowledge, Existing Attitudes, and Culture
Di Cui, Zihan Wang, Arthur Raney

The Effect of Counterexemplars and Victim Expectations on Crime Perceptions and Hostile Attitudes Toward Racial Minorities
Franklin Waddell

Emerging Currents in Communication/LGBTQ Studies: A Review of LGBTQ-Related Articles Published in Communication Journals from 2010 to 2015 Published in Communication Journals from 2010 to 2015
Lik Sam Chan

Exploiting Femininity in a Patriarchal Postfeminist Way: A Visual Content Analysis of Macau’s Tourism Ads
Zhen Sun

Citizenship as a Communicative Construct
Oren Livio

Redefining Relations Between Creators and Audiences in the Digital Age: The Social Production and Consumption of Chinese Internet Literature
Yuyan Feng, Ioana Literat

Linguistic Proximity and Global Flows of Television: A Study With Gatekeepers
Jelle Mast, Kelly de Ruiter, An Kuppens

The Conditional Nature of Presidential Agenda Influence on TV News: The Case of Education
Amber E. Boydstun, Rens Vliegenthart, Marshall Baker

Beyond Film Impact Assessment: Being Caribou Community Screenings as Activist Training Grounds
Shirley Roburn

Comment Counts or News Factors or Both? Influences on News Website Users’ News Selectioners’ News Selection
Ines Engelmann, Manuel Wendelin

FEATURES

A Reply to Faulhaber, Singer, and Urschel’s Curious Tale of Economics and Common Carriage (Net Neutrality) at the FCC
Dwayne Winseck, Jefferson Douglas Pooley

Rebuttal of Reply to Our Paper “The Curious Absence of Economic Analysis at the Federal Communications Commission: An Agency in Search of a Mission”
Gerald R. Faulhaber, Hal J. Singer, Augustus H. Urschel

Wrong, Unsupported and Irrelevant: A Reply to Winseck and Pooley’s “A Curious Tale of Economics and Common Carriage (Net Neutrality) at the FCC”
Mike Montgomery

The Curious Case of the Lack of Balance in the Winseck/Pooley Rebuttal
Tom Galvin

BOOK REVIEWS

Sara L. McKinnon, Robert Asen, Karma R. Chavez, and Robert Glenn Howard (Eds.), Text + Field: Innovations in Rhetorical Method
Thomas A. Discenna

Mark Lloyd and Lewis Friedland (Eds.), The Communication Crisis in America and How to Fix It
Christopher Ali

Angela Daly, Private Power, Online Information Flows and EU Law: Mind the Gap
Patricia Aufderheide

Chun Wei Choo, The Inquiring Organization: How Organizations Acquire Knowledge & Seek Information
Larry Zhiming Xu

Daphne Skillen, Freedom of Speech in Russia: Politics and Media from Gorbachev to Putin
Darya Novatorova    
Dan Caspi and Nelly Elias (Eds.), Ethnic Minorities in the Holy Land
Catherine Cassara

 

Thank you for your continuing interest in the work that IJoC publishes.

Larry Gross
Editor 

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor
                                                                                                             

The International Journal of Communication invites you to read these papers that published in MAY

Announcements header

The International Journal of Communication has published 48 papers in MAY 2017 which includes three Special Sections on Mediadem, Venture Labor and the Korean Wave. To access these papers, please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below or go to ijoc.org to read the Special Sections.

ARTICLES

Editorial Surveillance and the Management of Visibility in Peer Production
Christian Pentzold

Information Technology and Sustainability in the Information Society
Christian Fuch

Thank You, Mr. President: Journalist Gender in Presidential News Conferences
Lindsey Meeks

Illusions of Knowledge: Media Exposure and Citizens’ Perceived Political Competence
Mathias Weber, Christina Koehler

Election Pledge Rhetoric: Selling Policy with Words
Elina Lindgren, Elin Naurin

The Reasons Behind Tracing Audience Behavior: A Matter of Paternalism and Transparenc
Ester Appelgren

National Security Culture: Gender, Race and Class in the Production of Imperial Citizenship
Deepa Kumar

Influences on Job Expectations Among Chilean Journalism Students
Claudia Mellado, Andrés Scherman

The Effects of Generational Identification Accessibility and Normative Fit on Hostile Media Perception
Jisu Kim, Sung-Yeon Park

Internet Use, Freedom Supply, and Demand for Internet Freedom: A Cross-National Study of 20 Countries
Fei Shen

#Fringe, Audiences and Fan Labor: Twitter Activism to Save a TV Show From Cancellation
Mar Guerrero-Pico

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Mark Lloyd and Lewis A. Friedland (Eds.), The Communication Crisis in America and How to Fix It
Jay G. Blumler

Gil Z. Hochberg, Visual Occupations: Violence and Visibility in a Conflict Zone
Jeff Heydon

Andrew T. Lamas, Todd Wolfson, and Peter N. Funke (Eds.), The Great Refusal
Hao Cao

Jason Mittell, Complex TV: The Poetics of Contemporary Television Storytelling
Art Herbig

Making Sense of Communication Power and the New Information Warfare
Nathalie Maréchal

Brian Massumi, Ontopower: War, Powers, and the State of Perception
Catherine Chaput

Tim Highfield, Social Media and Everyday Politics
Erhaaaardt Graeff

Jeffrey Pomerantz, Metadata
Indrek Ibrus

Frank J. Macke, The Experience of Human Communication: Body, Flesh, and Relationship
Diana Ritter

Ulises Ali Mejias, Off the Network: Disrupting the Digital World
Pallaavi Guha

 

Thank you for your continuing interest in the work that IJoC publishes.

Larry Gross                                                   
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

International Journal of Communication 
Publishes a Special Section on the Korean Wave

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The Special Section The Korean Wave: Retrospect and Prospect, guest-edited by Dal Yong Jin and Tae-jin Yoon, published on May 23, 2017 includes eight articles by Asian media scholars.

The Korean Wave refers to the increasing popularity of Korean pop music, TV dramas, and movies throughout the world. Also known as hallyu in Korean, the term was first coined by the Chinese press in the late 1990s to describe the growing popularity of Korean pop culture in China.

The rapid growth of Korea’s cultural industries and the penetration of Korean cultural products in the global markets celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2017. The Korean Wave primarily started with a few well-made television dramas that were popular in East Asia; and Korean cultural industries subsequently developed other cultural forms, such as K-pop and digital games, that have gradually penetrated global markets.

The collection of articles in this Special Section explore the history of the Korean Wave as a catalyst of regional and global change by analyzing the evolution, structure, mechanisms, and strategies employed by the music, television, film, digital games, and animation industries in the global markets and their shifting relationships with the nation-state. They not only provide empirically plausible frameworks to examine their operations, but also discuss several key dimensions of the Korean Wave to help readers understand the nature of the emerging local popular culture and digital technologies as a new trend.

We invite you to read these articles that published in the International Journal of Communication.  Please Ctrl+Click on the article titles below for direct linking to the papers of interest.

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The Korean Wave: Retrospect and Prospect ― Introduction
Dal Yong Jin, Tae-jin Yoon

K-Pop in Latin America: Transcultural Fandom and Digital Mediation
Ben Han

K-Pop Fans React: Hybridity and the White Celebrity-Fan on YouTube
David Oh

When Indonesians Routinely Consume Korean Pop Culture: Revisiting Jakartan Fans of Korean Drama Dae Jang Geum
Jae-Seon Jeong, Seul-Hi Lee, Sang-Gil Lee

Domestic Hallyu: K-Pop Metatexts and the Media’s Self-Reflexive Gesture
Michelle Cho

Korean Wave Studies as Method: Reconsidering the Television Format Phenomenon between South Korea and China through Inter-Asian Frameworks
Younghan Cho, Hongrui Zhu

Cultural Translation of K-Pop Among Asian Canadian Fans
Kyong Yoon

Between Hybridity and Hegemony in K-Pop’s Global Popularity: A Case of “Girls’ Generation’s” American Debut
Gooyong Kim

________________________________________________________________________________________________

Larry Gross
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Dal Yong Jin, Tae-jin Yoon
Guest Editors

International Journal of Communication 
Publishes a Special Section on Venture Labor

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Do workers now see taking big risks as the only way to get ahead?

What is the impact of the high-stakes technology startup culture on the rest of the U.S. economy?

What lessons do the trends in media and communication jobs teach us about the future of work?

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Edited by Laura Robinson, Gina Neff, and Jeremy Schulz, this Special Section on Venture Labor begins to answer these and other timely questions about work and workers today.

A broad-ranging group of international scholars explores the concept of venture labor from multiple perspectives. Venture labor is the explicit expression of entrepreneurial values by non-entrepreneurs. As contributors argue, venture labor leads to the normalization of risk-taking in work, even when the odds are long and the winners are few. Nonetheless, a spirit of risk-taking, once seen as restricted to technology start-ups, now attracts workers across many industries willing to forgo the benefits and safety nets of traditional employment in exchange for new risks and opportunities.

Venture labor contributes to the shift of risk away from the social collectivity to the individual. This collection of essays covers venture labor phenomena including self-branding, social media professional marketing, entrepreneurial journalism, anytime-anywhere work, entrepreneurial self-actualization, crowdsourcing, and labor on ‘spec’ and other unpaid labor are all part of the venture labor trend covered in.

The Special Section brings together voices from multiple social science perspectives including communication, sociology, and media studies, with contributions from Laura Robinson, Jeremy Schulz, Alice E. Marwick, Nicole S. Cohen, C.W. Anderson, Michelle Rodino-Colocino, Enda Brophy, Gina Neff, Paul Hirsch, Sarah Banet-Weiser, Ofer Sharone, Barry Wellman, Dimitrina Dimitrova, Tsahi Hayat, Guang Ying Mo, Beverly Wellman, and Antonio Casilli. Together, these contributors grapple with the power of contradictory forces remaking the workplaces of the 21st century.

We invite you to read these 14 essays that published in the International Journal of Communication on May 10, 2017 at ijoc.org.

Larry Gross
Editor

Arlene Luck
Managing Editor

Laura Robinson, Gina Neff, Jeremy Schulz
Guest Editors