International Journal of Communication announces the publication of 71 papers that published in January

International Journal of Communication invites you to read these 71 papers that published in January

The International Journal of Communication is pleased to announce the publication of 71 papers in JANUARY 2023, which includes the “Special Section on Theorizing the Korean Wave” and the “Special Section on COVID-19, Digital Media, and Health.” To access these papers, Ctrl+Click on the titles below for direct hyperlinking or go to ijoc.org to read the Special Sections.
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ARTICLES

Journalistic Role Performance of the Thai Press on the Issue of Transgender Rights
Nattawaj Kijratanakoson 

From Westernization to Internationalization: Research Collaboration Networks of Communication Scholars From Central and Eastern Europe
Marton Demeter, Dina Vozab, Francisco José Segado Boj

Morally Driven and Emotionally Fueled: The Interactive Effects of Values and Emotions in the Social Transmission of Information Endorsing E-cigarettes
Jiaxi Wu, Yunwen Wang, Yusi Aveva Xu, Jessica L. Fetterman, Traci Hong 

Knowledge Work in Platform Fact-Checking Partnerships
Valérie Bélair-Gagnon, Rebekah Larsen, Lucas Graves, Oscar Westlund 

Plant-Based Meat and the Perceived Familiarity Gap Hypothesis: The Role of Health and Environmental Consciousness
Pengya Ai, Sofia Contreras-Yap, Shirley S. Ho

Googling in Russian Abroad: How Kremlin-Affiliated Websites Contribute to the Visibility of COVID-19 Conspiracy Theories in Search Results
Florian Toepfl, Anna Ryzhova, Daria Kravets, Arista Beseler

Echo Chambers, Cognitive Thinking Styles, and Mistrust? Examining the Roles Information Sources and Information Processing Play in Conspiracist Ideation
Brian McKernan, Patrícia Rossini, Jennifer Stromer-Galley

Meditating the Revolution: Analysis of the Sudanese Professionals Association Communicative Strategies During Sudan’s 2018–2019 Revolution
Hala A. Guta

A Persuadable Type? Personality Traits, Dissonant Information, and Political Persuasion
Alessandro Nai, Yves Schemeil, Chiara Valli 

More a Red Herring Than a Harbinger of Democracy: Myanmar’s Experiment With Media Freedom and Domestic Media Coverage of the Rohingya
Halle M. Young, Nicole Anderson, Mona S. Kleinberg, Jenifer Whitten-Woodring 

The Politics of Being a K-Pop Fan: Korean Fandom and the “Cancel the Japan Tour” Protest
Jennifer M. Kang 

“Seeing but not Believing”: Undergraduate Students’ Media Uses and News Trust
Ana Isabel Melro, Sara Pereira 

Blame It on the Algorithm? Russian Government-Sponsored Media and Algorithmic Curation of Political Information on Facebook
Elizaveta Kuznetsova, Mykola Makhortykh 

Making Sense of Human Advocacy Narrative: Raising Support for People Seeking Asylum Among Diverse Audiences
Merrilyn Delporte, Bree Hurst, Jennifer Bartlett, Caroline Hatcher

Migrating Counterpublics: German Far-Right Online Groups on Russian Social Media
Vadim Voskresenskii

Diraya.media—Learning Media Literacy With and From Media Activists
Philipp Seuferling, Ingrid Forsler, Gretchen King, Isabel Löfgren, Farah Saati 

“We Have No Newspapers . . . Dull! Dull!”: Mass Media Dependency During the American Civil War
Betty Houchin Winfield, Chad Painter 

From the Global to the Local and Back Again: MFAs’ Digital Communications During COVID-19
Ilan Manor, Moran Yrachi

Collaborative I-Docs Beyond the Screens: Face-to-Face Participation Processes in Interactive Non-Fiction
Juanjo Balaguer, Arnau Gifreu-Castells

Cuteness in Mobile Messaging: An Exploration of Virtual “Cute” Sticker Use in China and the United States
Dongdong Yang, Laura Labato, Shardé M. Davis, Yuren Qin

Health, Concerns, and Finance: News Framing of Wearing Masks in China From 2001 to 2020
Zhifei Mao, Huaxin Peng, Di Wang, Mengfan He, Kun Zhou

Language Ideologies and Behavioral Attitudes Toward Ethnolinguistic Outgroups: Perceived Linguistic Competence and Intergroup Anxiety as Explanatory Variables
Gretchen Montgomery-Vestecka, Yan Bing Zhang

Social Entrepreneurship Versus Conventional Entrepreneurship: How Entrepreneurship Orientation Moderates the Effects of Human Capital and Social Capital Signals on Media Crowdfunding Success
Jiyoung Cha

Crisis Communication on Twitter: Differences Between User Types in Top Tweets About the 2015 “Refugee Crisis” in Germany
Sanja Kapidzic, Felix Frey, Christoph Neuberger, Stefan Stieglitz, Milad Mirbabaie

“A Very Difficult Choice”: Bolsonaro and Petismo in Brazilian Newspapers
Juliana Gagliardi, Camilla Tavares, Afonso de Albuquerque

Processing Vaccine Misinformation: Recall and Effects of Source Type on Claim Accuracy via Perceived Motivations and Credibility
Michelle A. Amazeen, Arunima Krishna  

From System to Skill: Palo Alto Group’s Contested Legacy of Communication
Yonatan Fialkoff, Amit Pinchevski

User Perceptions and Trust of Explainable Machine Learning Fake News Detectors
Jieun Shin, Sylvia Chan-Olmsted 

Activists and Journalists as Co-Creators and Co-Revisionists of U.S. Histories: The 1619 New York Times Project
Elaine Almeida, Sue Robinson

When Do Data Collection and Use Become a Matter of Concern? A Cross-Cultural Comparison of U.S. and Dutch Privacy Attitudes
Jessica Vitak, Yuting Liao, Anouk Mols, Daniel Trottier, Michael Zimmer, Priya C. Kumar, Jason Pridmore

Cues Signaling Gender Segregation and Gender Inclusion in Public Spaces Affect Adolescents’ Binary Conceptualization of Gender and Attitudes Toward Transgender and Nonbinary People
Traci K. Gillig, Sonia Jawaid Shaikh, Leila Bighash

Self- and Social Corrections on Instant Messaging Platforms
Sheryl Wei Ting Ng, Taberez Ahmed Neyazi

Is the MENA Surfing to the Extremes? Digital and Social Media, Echo Chambers/Filter Bubbles, and Attitude Extremity
Kevin M. Wagner, Jason Gainous, Allison Warnersmith, Dane Warner

The New American Dream: Neoliberal Transformation as Character Development in Schitt’s Creek
William Joseph Sipe  

Distinction and Cosmopolitanism: Latin American Middle-Class, Elite Audiences and Their Preferences for Transnational Television and Film
Joseph Straubhaar, Melissa Santillana, Vanessa de Macedo Higgins-Joyce, Luiz G. Duarte

Social Media and Protest Behavior in a Restrictive Traditional Media Environment: The Case of the Philippines
Jason P. Abbott, Jason Gainous, Kevin M. Wagner

The Mediating Role of Depression in the Relationship Between News Consumption and Interparty Hostility During Covid-19
Meital Balmas, Renana Atia, Eran Halperin 

“They Just Want to Erase Us”: Triumphant Modernity and Catastrophic Witnessing in Debates About Genocide in Xinjiang 
Stephen J. Hartnett, Andrew Gilmore

A Systematic Literature Review of Research From 2010 to 2020 Addressing User-Generated Online Comments Related to Health Issues and Recommendations for Future Research
Muhammad Ittefaq, Mauryne Abwao, Ioana A. Coman, Waqas Ejaz

A Leader and a Lady? A Computational Approach to Detection of Political Gender Stereotypes in Facebook User Comments
Aliya Andrich, Emese Domahidi

Believing in Credibility Measures: Reviewing Credibility Measures in Media Research From 1951 to 2018
Anina Hanimann, Andri Heimann, Lea Hellmueller, Damian Trilling

A Multiple-Stakeholder Perspective of Patient–Provider Communication Among Families With Rare Diseases in Taiwan Through a Cross-Cultural Lens
Jinli Wu, Hsinyi Hsiao, Lei Chen, Chun-Ying Weng, Pao-Sheng Chang, Shao-Yin Chu

Intergroup Contact, Traditional and Social Media Use, and Attitudes Toward Chinese People in COVID-19: U.S. College Students’ Perspective
Yan Bing Zhang, Teri Terigele, Molly Han, Sile Li, Yang Yu, Racheal Ruble

FEATURE

Renewing Pedagogical Research and Practices: Helping International Students Succeed Post-COVID-19
Piyawan Charoensap-Kelly, Narissra Punyanunt-Carter

BOOK REVIEWS

Amir Hetsroni and Meriç Tuncez (Eds.), It Happened on Tinder: Reflections and Studies on Internet-Infused Dating
Min Wang

Lindsay Ems, Virtually Amish: Preserving Community at the Internet’s Margins
Louisa S. White

Lisa M. Tillmann, Kathryn Norsworthy, and Steven Schoen, Mindful Activism: Autoethnographies of Social Justice Communication for Campus and Community Transformation
Courtney D. Tabor

Emily Hund, The Influencer Industry: The Quest for Authenticity on Social Media
Tyler Quick

Qiao Li, Yanqiu Guan, and Hong Lu (Eds.), Development of the Global Film Industry: Industrial Competition and Cooperation in the Context of Globalization
Youwen Ma

Elaine J. Yuan, The Web of Meaning: The Internet in a Changing Chinese Society
Eileen Le Han 

Last Moyo, The Decolonial Turn in Media Studies in Africa and the Global South
Burçe Çelik  

María Pia López, Not One Less: Mourning, Disobedience and Desire
Lucila Rozas Urrunaga

Victor Fan, Cinema Illuminating Reality: Media Philosophy Through Buddhism
Jacob Green

Zac Gershberg and Sean Illing, The Paradox of Democracy: Free Speech, Open Media, and Perilous Persuasion
Yotam Ophir

Rolien Hoyng and Gladys Pak Lei Chong (Eds.), Critiquing Communication Innovation: New Media in a Multipolar World
Liting Lu

Louisa Ha and Lars Willan (Eds.), The U.S.-China Trade War: Global News Framing and Public Opinion in the Digital Age
Tanja Vierrether

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Larry Gross, Editor
Kady Bell-Garcia, Managing Editor
Chi Zhang, Managing Editor, Special Sections

Please note that according to the latest Google Scholar statistics, IJoC ranks 9th among all Humanities journals and 9th among all Communications journals in the world — demonstrating the viability of open access scholarly publication at the highest level. 

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on COVID-19, Digital Media, and Health

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on COVID-19, Digital Media, and Health


What role do and did digital media play in individuals’ health during the COVID-19 pandemic? And vice versa, what impact does or did individuals’ health have on their digital media use in pandemic times?

Guest-edited by Kathrin Karsay, Anne-Linda Camerini, and Jörg Matthes, this Special Section on COVID-19, Digital Media, and Health addresses the role of digital media as an information source, a tool for emotional expression, and, consequently, a determinant of psychological and social well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. It includes six articles covering research data from the United States, Ireland, the Netherlands, and South Korea. As such, the authors provide diverse and rich perspectives on the correlations of COVID-19, digital media, and health. The theoretical and empirical contributions provide lessons for research on digital media and health in a pandemic—but also beyond. We conclude that the pandemic has provided an impetus for reflection within the discipline and call for renewed focus on theory building as well as longitudinal, multi-data, multi-platform, and multi-method designs.

We invite you to read these articles that published in the International Journal of Communication on January 10, 2023. Please log into ijoc.org to read the papers of interest. We look forward to your feedback! 

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COVID-19, Digital Media, and Health: Lessons Learned and the Way Ahead for the Study of Human Communication—Introduction
Kathrin Karsay, Anne-Linda Camerini, Jörg Matthes

Communicating About Mental Health During a Pandemic: An Examination of Active and Aware Publics on Twitter
Jesse King, Audrey Halversen, Olivia Morrow, Whitney Westhoff, Pamela Brubaker

Health Messaging and Social Media: An Examination of Message Fatigue, Race, and Emotional Outcomes Among Black Audiences
Hope Hickerson, David Stamps 

Children’s and Parents’ Worries About Online Schooling Associated With Children’s Anxiety During Lockdown in Ireland
Derek A. Laffan, Seffetullah Kuldas, Beatrice Sciacca, James O’Higgins Norman, Tijana Milosevic

Beliefs in Times of Corona: Investigating the Relationship Between Media Use and COVID-19 Conspiracy Beliefs Over Time in a Representative Dutch Sample
Marloes van Wezel, Emiel Krahmer, Ruben Vromans, Nadine Bol 

Exposure to COVID-19 Misinformation Across Instant Messaging Apps: Moderating Roles of News Media and Interpersonal Communication      
Woohyun Yoo, Sang-Hwa Oh, Doo-Hun Choi 

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Larry Gross, Editor 
Kady Bell-Garcia, Managing Editor
Chi Zhang, Managing Editor, Special Sections
Kathrin Karsay, Anne-Linda Camerini, and Jörg Matthes, Guest Editors

Please note that according to the latest Google Scholar statistics, IJoC ranks 9th among all Humanities journals and 9th among all Communications journals in the world — demonstrating the viability of open access scholarly publication at the highest level.

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on Theorizing the Korean Wave

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on Theorizing the Korean Wave


Has the Korean Wave meaningfully changed the direction of cultural flows? Does the Korean Wave advance any tangible theoretical frameworks in media studies and Asian studies? Three decades after the emergence of the Korean Wave, many theoreticians and students are wondering whether Korea continues to develop popular culture, and therefore, whether Korean cultural content provides new conceptual and theoretical foundations in globalization and transnationalization studies. 

Guest-edited by Dal Yong Jin, this Special Section on Theorizing the Korean Wave aims to provide a space for discussions surrounding the possibilities for advancing non-Western theories or new perspectives amid the continuing Korean Wave, or Hallyu, phenomenon. As demonstrated by the popularity of Squid Game, Parasite, and BTS, the Korean Wave has become one of the most significant cultural scenes originating from the East. Against this backdrop, authors in this Special Section seek to shed light on current debates centered around the Korean Wave and place them in renewed perspectives that further future transnational cultural research. 

Written by 10 leading theoreticians and emerging media scholars located in various parts of the world, including the United States, Canada, Israel, Hong Kong, and South Korea, these papers investigate the recent surge of Hallyu from diverse perspectives, including transnationality, K-pop, Korean dramas, platform imperialism, gender and sexuality, and artificial intelligence. Together, they advance non-Western theoretical frameworks that media scholars and students learn and apply to their works. The Special Section provides new concepts, ideas, and knowledge that showcase the significant movements taking place in Hallyu research and point to directions for future studies. 

Together, the contributions to this Special Section provide new lenses to understand the increasing role of the Korean Wave in media studies, cultural studies, area studies, and gender studies.  

We invite you to read these articles that published in the International Journal of Communication on January 1, 2023. Please log into ijoc.org to read the papers of interest. We look forward to your feedback! 

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Theorizing the Korean Wave: Introduction to New Perspectives—Introduction 
Dal Yong Jin

Transnational Proximity of the Korean Wave in the Global Cultural Sphere 
Dal Yong Jin

Shock and Surprise: Theorizing the Korean Wave Through Mediatized Emotions
Irina Lyan 

K(Q)ueer-Pop for Another World: Toward a Theorization of Gender and Sexuality in K-Pop
Jungmin Kwon 

Netflix and Platform Imperialism: How Netflix Alters the Ecology of the Korean TV Drama Industry
Ji Hoon Park, Kristin April Kim, Yongsuk Lee

K-Pop Without Koreans: Racial Imagination and Boundary Making in K-Pop
Ji-Hyun Ahn

Translational Audiences in the Age of Transnational K-Pop 
Kyong Yoon

Virtual Technology in Netflix K-Drama: Augmented Reality, Hologram, and Artificial Intelligence
Jinhee Park

K-Culture Without “K-“? The Paradoxical Nature of Producing Korean Television Toward a Sustainable Korean Wave 
Taeyoung Kim

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Larry Gross, Editor
Kady Bell-Garcia, Managing Editor
Chi Zhang, Managing Editor, Special Sections
Dal Yong Jin, Guest Editor

Please note that according to the latest Google Scholar statistics, IJoC ranks 9th among all Humanities journals and 9th among all Communications journals in the world — demonstrating the viability of open access scholarly publication at the highest level. 

International Journal of Communication announces the publication of 36 papers that published in NOVEMBER

International Journal of Communication invites you to read these 36 papers that published in November

The International Journal of Communication is pleased to announce the publication of 36 papers in NOVEMBER 2022, which includes the “Special Section on Precarious Migrants in a Sharing Economy.” To access these papers, Ctrl+Click on the titles below for direct hyperlinking or go to ijoc.org to read the Special Section.
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ARTICLES

The Dialectic Polarization of Consensus Formation: An Analysis of Civic Studies Media Discourse in Israel
Elie Friedman, Michal Neubauer-Shani

A Failed Regulatory Remedy? An Empirical Examination of Affordable BroadbandPlan Obligations
Hernan Galperin

The COVID−19 Vaccination Campaign and Disinformation on Twitter: The Role of Opinion Leaders and Political Social Media Influencers in the Italian Debate on Green Pass
Sara Monaci, Simone Persico

Gamer Identity and Social Class: An Analysis of Barcelona Teenagers’ Discourses on Videogame Culture and Gaming Practices
Júlia Vilasís-Pamos, Óliver Pérez-Latorre

Taking the Audience Seriously? The Normative Construction of Engaged Journalism
Jacob L. Nelson, Thomas R. Schmidt

Who You Are Can Predict What You Say on a Virtual Date: Traits as Predictors of Communication Patterns of Young Men Who Have Sex With Men
Liyuan Wang, Ashley Brown, Lynn C. Miller

A Serial Mediation Model Predicting Covid-19 Vaccines Acceptance in Portugal: The Critical Role of Conspiracy Theories in the Wake of Perceived Quality of Government Communication and National Stereotypes
Christin-Melanie Vauclair, Elena Piccinelli

LGBTQ+ Collegiate Athletes and the Double Bind: Insights From the Experiences of Out Varsity Athletes
Evan Brody, D. Travers Scott, Katrina L. Pariera

Live, Work, Play: Exploring the Rhetorical Dimension of Remote Work Attraction Incentives Programs
Alberto Lusoli

Cognitive Dissonance in Social Media and Face-to-Face Interactions in Relation to the Legacy of War
Sanja Vico

The Other Side of the Pandemic: Effects of Racialized News Coverage on Attitudes Toward Asians and Immigrants
Martina Santia, Ayla Oden, Seon-Woo Kim, Raymond J. Pingree, Jessica Wyers, Kirill Bryanov

Balancing Opportunities and Incentives: How Rising China’s Mediated Public Diplomacy Changes Under Crisis
Kentaro Nakamura

Coping With Disruption: What This New World Says About Digital Divide Theory
Ashley J. Coventry, Crystal Leung, Bryan Zuniga, Kacey Hsu, Amy L. Gonzales

Agents of Change and Contentious Agents Interwoven Narratives in the Visual Representations of the Protester in News Magazine Covers
Delia Dumitrica, Alexandra Schwinges

Cultivating Communication Resilience as an Adaptive-Transformative Process During a Global Pandemic: Extending the Purview of the Communication Theory of Resilience
Adwoa Sikayena Amankwah, Prince Adu Gyamfi, Abigail Narkie Oduro

Visual Representations in Organizational Instagram Photos and the Public’s Responses: Focusing on Nonprofit Organizations
Yunhwan Kim, Siyeon Jang

Nonlinear Program Repeat-Viewing Patterns and Their Determinants
Yunjin Choi, Bong Gyou Lee

Networked Huawei Agendas During the U.S.-China Trade Conflict: The Interrelationships Between Huawei, the News Media, and Public Tweets
Zahedur Rahman Arman

“Spectacular” User Subjectivities on Instagram: A Discursive Interface Analysis
Lydia Kollyri, Dimitra L. Milioni

Imagining Algorithms to Believe In: Comparing OkCupid and Tinder Users’ Perceptions of Algorithms to Uncover Alternatives to Algorithmic Exploitation on Dating Apps
Gregory Narr

Is Open Communication Scholarship a Promise or Peril? Preliminary Interviews With Qualitative Communication Scholars
Rukun Zhang, Jiankun Gong, Weipeng Hou, Amira Firdaus, Jinghong Xu

The Effects of Narratives and Disclosure Timings on Reducing Stigma and Implicit Bias Against People Suffering From Mental Illness
Sushma Kumble, Fuyuan Shen

Between Tradition and Modernity: Representation of Women in Family Planning Campaigns in Pakistan
Farah Azhar

BOOK REVIEWS

Valérie Bélair-Gagnon and Nikki Usher (Eds.), Journalism Research That Matters
Adina Schneeweis

Kate Fortmueller, Hollywood Shutdown: Production, Distribution, and Exhibition in the Time of COVID
Nanor Vosgueritchian

Priscilla Hobbs (Ed.), Interpreting and Experiencing Disney: Mediating the Mouse
Noah Zweig

Gino Canella, Activist Media: Documenting Movements and Networked Solidarity
Patricia Aufderheide

Ralph Tench, Juan Meng, and Ángeles Moreno (Eds.), Strategic Communication in a Global Crisis: National and International Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic
Marina Rospitasari, Hersintus Suwenda Syahsuyoso, Ivana Pascalia Sooai

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Larry Gross, Editor
Arlene Luck, Founding Managing Editor  
Kady Bell-Garcia, Managing Editor
Chi Zhang, Managing Editor, Special Sections

Please note that according to the latest Google Scholar statistics, IJoC ranks 9th among all Humanities journals and 9th among all Communications journals in the world — demonstrating the viability of open access scholarly publication at the highest level. 

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on Precarious Migrants in a Sharing Economy

International Journal of Communication Publishes a Special Section on
Precarious Migrants in a Sharing Economy


How does enabling collective action in a sharing economy contribute to solving the challenge of migrant governance and care work in precarious contexts?

Despite claims that societies are increasingly affected by the sharing economy, there remains a paucity of evidence on the impact of sharing economic systems for marginalized communities. Some scholars argue that the sharing economy marked the emergence of an ad hoc governance structure, including joint efforts from the public sector, NGOs, private firms, civil society, and migrant organizations, to tackle the issues relating to integrating precarious migrants. On the other hand, the complexity of multi-level governance systems and collaborations can generate greater uncertainty about migrant management and care.

Guest-edited by Amanda Alencar and Yijing Wang, this Special Section on Precarious Migrants in a Sharing Economy aims at advancing knowledge on how collective action is enabled in the sharing economy in support of precarious migrants in a diversity of contexts and situations, and the extent to which technological innovations, such as digital media, data systems and networks, help promote migrants’ socioeconomic participation, citizenship, and well-being in a sharing framework.

The contributions to this Special Section are valuable at this point in time given the complex and rapidly changing circumstances of migration as a global and regional phenomenon, which not only represents an immense humanitarian and logistical challenge, but also poses a challenge to established governance structures. In addition, given the impact of the COVID-19 crisis at a global level, there is an even more pressing need to shed light on the potentialities and vulnerabilities of digital responses and initiatives put in place by local organizations, migrants, and volunteers to fill the gaps in states’ asylum and integration systems during the pandemic.

We invite you to read these articles that published in the International Journal of Communication on November 21, 2022. Please log into ijoc.org to read the papers of interest. We look forward to your feedback! 

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Precarious Migrants in a Sharing Economy: Collective Action, Organizational Communication, and Digital Technologies—Introduction 
Amanda Alencar, Yijing Wang

The Rise of Platformized Governance in China: Migration, Technology, and Social Integration 
Sun Ping

Looking Good or Doing Good? A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Employee Perception of Corporate Refugee Support
Yijing Wang

On-Demand Migrants: Entrepreneurialism, Platformization, and Migration in Brazil
Sofia Cavalcanti Zanforlin, Rafael Grohmann

Digital Solidarity and Ethical Tech for Refugees: Why We Need to Care More and Code Less 
Sara Marino 

Data Literacy as an Emerging Challenge in the Migration/Refugee Context: A Critical Exploration of Communication Efforts Around “Refugee Apps” 
Dennis Nguyen, Sergül Nguyen

#Migrantes on TikTok: Exploring Platformed Belongings
Daniela Jaramillo-Dent, Amanda Alencar, Yan Asadchy

#Nosomosdesertores: Activism and Narratives of the Cuban Diaspora on Twitter   
Denise Maria Cogo, Deborah Rodríguez Santos

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Larry Gross, Editor
Arlene Luck, Founding Managing Editor  
Kady Bell-Garcia, Managing Editor
Chi Zhang, Managing Editor, Special Sections
Amanda Alencar and Yijing Wang, Guest Editors

Please note that according to the latest Google Scholar statistics, IJoC ranks 9th among all Humanities journals and 9th among all Communications journals in the world — demonstrating the viability of open access scholarly publication at the highest level.